Spike Camp

Weatherby Nation => Around the Campfire (General Discussion) => Topic started by: carpetking on November 24, 2017, 12:07:30 PM

Title: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: carpetking on November 24, 2017, 12:07:30 PM
I have been a weatherby owner for 40 years. What do you guys think about this 6.5 creedmoor hype. It is the best cartridge kmown to man flat as a 300 win mag no recoil. I think it all about the bullets
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 24, 2017, 12:18:57 PM
Mine is setup as a target rifle. It's a accurate round and fairly cheap to shoot. I'm sure you have looked at the ballistic numbers.  Weatherby is chambering it in Vanguards and Mark V's.  Yea, it's a good idea, IMO.   :)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: BB340 on November 24, 2017, 12:38:51 PM
I don't know what the hype about it is for. I didn't find mine anymore accurate than any other cartridge I have. I believe it's just that the market is flooded with the Creedmoor Craze so people tend to think it is the best thing since sliced bread. It is no more accurate or as good for hunting as say the good old 6.5x55 or the .260 Rem. I actually just put my Creedmoor up for sale. I own a .260 and one of the best 6.5 rounds but not known much which is the 6.5x65 RWS. 
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: .257 on November 24, 2017, 01:07:31 PM
I agree its all in the bullets in the 6.5.. I cant see anything special about a creedmore other than good marketing

Like BB340 said a 260 rem, 6.5X55, 6.5X65 RWS, 6.5-284, 284 win just to name a few will all out perform a creedmore.

Lately there are more long range matches won with the 284 win all the time
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: galamb on November 24, 2017, 02:05:15 PM
I don't target shoot so while I checked out all the numbers, because I like "cool new stuff", I just couldn't see how or where the caliber would help me out.

I also don't shoot "far" when I hunt. So my 243 does it for deer (and incidental black bear) and my 7.08 is my moose/black bear rifle.

I could probably mothball both of them and go with the 6.5 (and yes, I would not feel under gunned for moose with a 140 grain A-Frame bullet - eastern moose will let you get well within 100 yards and 50 yards is typical shot distance) but the same could be said for my 7.08.

So while "cool", I just don't see a personal need for a 6.5
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: terminator on November 24, 2017, 02:17:14 PM
BC of the 6.5 bullets is where it's at.I went with the 260 Rem because it is slightly faster.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 24, 2017, 02:22:55 PM
It's still fun and CHEAP to shoot with very little recoil. It's a decent round for deer sized critters, light weight rifles and a new shooter.    :)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Michiganhunter on November 24, 2017, 03:51:46 PM
I like reading and informing myself regarding all cartridges. The Creedmoor has been receiving quite a bit of print lately and rightly so. A nice, easy to shoot cartridge with little recoil. Quite a few quality bullets available for reloading and factory loads too. More articles to read and talk about with our buddies and thatís good.
I love my Weatherby ULW 6.5-.300 and it is very comfortable to shoot even without a muzzle brake. I like to try out new products from rifles to cartridges to scopes and binoculars and everything in between.
The members of the Nation and NRA are into this sport of ours so more information on just about anything hunting and shooting is interesting. This Creedmoor subject is just another piece of hunting and shooting information for us to discuss. Itís fun to educate ourselves about another aspect of our addiction.
I just spent a few minutes thinking and writing about a Creedmoor. I enjoyed doing so. It was not wasted time. It was time spent reading about hunting and shooting. I like to hunt and I like to shoot. I am involved in something I like. It was a few minutes well spent.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Blackbear3 on November 24, 2017, 04:05:27 PM
My buddy is looking for a long range cartridge for elk hunting and has been kicking around the 6.5 Creedmoor. This link seems to have changed his mind on the 6.5 creedmoor.

https://skyaboveus.com/hunting-shooting/Long-Range-Elk-Cartridge-Virtual-Shootout
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Big Muddy rancher on November 24, 2017, 04:38:13 PM
So how does the Weatherby 300 mag fair against the 300 Win Mag?
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 24, 2017, 05:04:48 PM
My choice isn't on that list either! 325WSM.  Shooting a game critter at those distances allows so much flight time, the critter has too much time to move! JMO! In the more reasonable 300 yds. or less, they all work!  :)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Blackbear3 on November 24, 2017, 05:14:02 PM
My 340 is on the list but not my 6.5-300, which I've been trying to steer him towards. Personally I think 400 yds is plenty far enough, but until I actually shoot past that distance I have no idea.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Michiganhunter on November 24, 2017, 08:07:16 PM
I am very impressed with my 6.5-300 Wby for whitetails. Iíve shot elk from big cows to big bulls with a .50 caliber muzzleloader and 260-300 grain bullets up to (laser ranged) 364 yds. with solid one shot kills and no more than 100 yds. before they dropped. Iíve also used a .300 Wby, .300 win mag and .338 win mag. I used a Remington 700 bdl in 30-06 with 180 gr. Barnes Bullets with good results.
I know with good bullet placement through the lungs my 6.5-300 Wby would do just fine. That said, I know I would use the .300ís as a minimum and, push come to shove, I would feel the most confident with the.338.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Michiganhunter on November 24, 2017, 08:40:49 PM
I am also quite curious about the .325 wsm and a .340 Wby. If I were hunting just big elk bulls i would have to buy a .340. I am interested in the .325 wsm but donít know enough about them in real world hunting situations to make an informed opinion.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: dubyam on November 25, 2017, 04:56:33 AM
The 325WSM is an excellent round. But it is a handloader's round only, and I'd advise buying 300-500rds of brass when you get one, backus it won't always be available.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 25, 2017, 05:23:16 AM
The 325WSM is an excellent round. But it is a handloader's round only, and I'd advise buying 300-500rds of brass when you get one, backus it won't always be available.
Only one source of brass from Nosler, expensive! Most of the bullets available are for the Mauser and not quite up to the velocity of the 325 WSM.  Loaded ammo is difficult to find, also.  One is available on Midway this morning.  I do have several hundred brass. My best round, so far, is with the 220gr. Swift A-Frame using RL19, again a expensive bullet. I agree, it was obsolete before it ever had a chance. My model 70 Sporter with a Zeiss is a tack driver on paper, haven't taken any critters with it. I would use it for anything most would use a .338 caliber for. The advantage of the Creedmoor is the huge selection of brass and bullets at a reasonable cost, being a cheap bastard!   ;D
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 25, 2017, 06:14:30 AM
My 325 Winchester Model 70 Sporter with a Zeiss 3-9X  and my Savage 10BA Stealth in 6.5 Creedmoor.   :)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Blackbear3 on November 25, 2017, 06:43:26 AM
The 325 wsm would be a perfect in between for deer and elk but seems to be going the same way as my 300 SAUM. It's pretty much a hand loading only round already, but the little Remington 7 in 300 SAUM was my go to rifle for elk hunting for 15 years. I did find quite a bit of 325 WSM ammo at ammoseek Michiganhunter.  Thanks for the Saturday morning gun porn Bad.

https://ammoseek.com/ammo/325wsm
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: wyominghunter on November 25, 2017, 07:20:48 AM
I don't get all of the 6.5 Creedmoor hype either. Yes, they have made some very good long range bullets in the 6.5 caliber, but there isn't any mathematical magic here. Physics are physics...and those laws are extremely difficult to get around.  Bottom line is if I fill a larger case with more powder behind the same bullet (all other things being equal), it will go further...faster. Projectile motion is funny that way.

I'm sure it is accurate and a good mid-sized game round. I personally don't use any 6.5 round for anything bigger than mule deer. I have a .264 Win Mag and am putting together a 6.5-300 Weatherby, but I wouldn't reach for either of them for something like elk ahead of a 7mm, .30 cal, or .338 cal.

I think the 6.5 Creedmoor is a good mid-range caliber, but certainly no better than a .260, 6.5x55, or 6.5-284.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: eford on November 25, 2017, 08:29:11 AM
The wide variety of .264 caliber bullets means the whole family of 6.5mm rifles have a great chance of matching a very good hunting or match bullet to what that rifle likes. Be it a 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser or a  6.5-300 Weatherby Magnum, you really arenít going to find one that is a failure. One has a tad more velocity than another, except for the 6.5-300 and itís in a class by itself.

I have a 6.5mm. Creedmoor that is a fine long range hunting rifle. I wanted it to be my lightweight rifle but that didnít work, but it is still a great hunting rifle. My Creedmoor is no easier to reload than another cartridge. Lots of brass is available, so for now things with it are easy. A 260 Rem or a 264 Win Mag can be just as good. So can a 6.5-284 Norma or a 6.5mm Rem Mag.

Whatever you hunt with, be great with it.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: .257 on November 25, 2017, 08:52:15 AM
Nice looking rifle, what make is it?
What is that on your barrel?
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: BB340 on November 25, 2017, 12:32:33 PM
My choice isn't on that list either! 325WSM.  Shooting a game critter at those distances allows so much flight time, the critter has too much time to move! JMO! In the more reasonable 300 yds. or less, they all work!  :)



My sentiments exactly too Bad. Although I haven't shot much big game with my .325 WSM it is a very underrated round. It has all the power of the great 8mm Rem Mag in a short compact cartridge. The few critters I have shot with mine couldn't tell the difference between the two lol.
Plus one on being 300 yds or less too.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 25, 2017, 02:40:40 PM
The 6.5 Creedmoor is not a one gun solution to every hunting/shooting situation. It is accurate, fun and cheap to shoot and everybody makes ammo, dies and brass for it.  That is why we all own more than a 30-06 or a 270 Win.   ;D
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on November 25, 2017, 05:59:58 PM
The 6.5 creedmoor was designed as a longer range  target round to reduce shooter fatigue vs the larger 30 cal mag's.  My wife has killed elk with her creedmoor at short range 150 yds or so, and the 129 grain hornady interlock blew right thru and exited center mass on a nice sized cow.  I personally wouldn't have a problem using a 6.5 creedmoor on any size bull elk up to around 400 yds on a broadside shot.  There in lies the problem those old bulls just don't sit there and let you shoot them a lot of the time,  they move at the wrong instant you touch off the trigger. Where the 6.5 creedmoor shines is on smaller animals such as deer and antelope at longer ranges,  they are just not as tough as elk.  Most of my friends that hunt 1000 yds elk and smaller game usually use 7mm rem mags using 160/175 grain bullets ,  a few use 300 what evers ,  NONE use berger bullets on elk,  on a perfect shot they may work but are made to come apart, and therein lies the other problem with elk as taking a lot of killing sometimes.  I prefer to break everything in the bullets path on elk and if that means reducing my shooting ranges that's what we do.  Instead of watching some un trained slob hunter just throwing lead out there  making a fool out of himself and worst wounding and not finding the animal because they are too lazy or incapable of tracking it.  The 6.5 Creedmoor is not a 1000 yd or even closer elk caliber, and was never intended as one, and that goes for any of the other cartridges in it's class.  Elk are not armored plated either, but you do need enough horse power and bullet penetration to get the job done as quickly as possible at what ever your maximum given ranges is per cartridge used, even the old 30-30 is a fine elk cartridge if you get close enough.   
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: danno50 on November 25, 2017, 08:27:35 PM
I think the 6.5 CM is a great little caliber that has done well for itself since it's inception. Its not the best caliber ever developed, or the do all end all rifle of all time, but I do think its got a strong following for a lot of reasons. Does it outperform the 26 Nosler or the 6.5/284, no, but it is more popular and carries itself on its own merit. Some people new to shooting and hunting want to have the same type of rifle that precision shooters have and theres nothing wrong with that as long as they research what their buying and its what they want. The fact that Weatherby developed a 6.5-300 also may give more credibility to the 6.5 CM, and it probably is about the bullets and their high BC's offering less wind drift, a bit less recoil and good accuracy at long range.(the only guys that shoot elk at 6 or 700 yards + are on TV) Anyway the OP never asked if it was a good long range elk rifle, someone just threw that into this thread later, so its not a 340 or 338, or a 6.5-300, but its a great long distance target rifle, and probably a legitimate 3 and 400 yard big game cartridge(no big bears) 
 Heres a couple of snippets from a magazine review:   

6.5 Creedmoor Earns Its Rightful Place:
Who knew Hornadyís 6.5 Creedmoor would cause such a stir? The combination of cost, availability, ballistic performance and outright success from the worldís best precision shooters all combined to create an endorsement seldom seen in the ammo. Letís face it, for every caliber worth its weight, there are 10 more with minor differences being produced, perhaps because somebody wants their name on a cartridge. The 6.5 Creedmoor is not one of those. Even the better-performing 6.5◊47 Lapua, which got its start in 2005, doesnít get the same love as the Creedmoor. The 6.5 Creedmoor was, until Weatherbyís 6.5-.300, the first buzz-worthy cartridge I can recall since the .260 Remington.
As a result of such an endorsement, and because so many precision shooters and marksmen in general also hunt, the popularity shift from precision shooting to hunting and even modern sporting rifles was inevitable.
I mention MSRs because the 6.5 Creedmoor grew in popularity in both bolt-action and semi-automatic MSR platforms exponentially over traditional wood-stocked classics, although Ruger produces quite a nice M77 Hawkeye Predator Rifle and Weatherby also offers a nice Vanguard. While I am not sure if this trend is because traditionalists like to stick to classic mainstream calibers or not, I do know the 6.5 CM short action certainly has earned its place in those luxurious, head-turning, exotic wood stocks; moreover, the 6.5 is becoming somewhat mainstream with increasing availability. Even the Weatherby Mark V is now available in 6.5-.300, a newly unveiled caliber actually birthed by Roy Weatherby himself in the early 1950s ó another story in itself.

6.5 Creedmoor On The Hunt:
Either way, the 6.5 fire has surely ignited in the hunting world.
While the cartridge is quite an amazing caliber choice for deer, antelope, hogs and other mid-sized animals, its dominant performance in predator hunting is also a big factor ó especially at long range.

Moreover, many agree the 6.5 Creedmoor is a formidable cartridge, even for big game such as elk. In fact, many suggest ó and ballistics support ó the 6.5 Creedmoorís terminal performance as it relates to any North American game animal. Considering the dream combination the 6.5 CM presents, including higher velocity and energy at extended ranges, greater sectional density (.287) for deeper penetration, better BC for improved trajectory and even reduced recoil, itís no wonder hunters are following suit with precision shooters and jumping aboard the 6.5 Creedmoor train.

Whether your clients are competitive precision shooters, hardcore hunters or both, the 6.5mm Creedmoor is worth their attention. If theyíre not shooting this amazing cartridge now, they will be.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: eford on November 26, 2017, 04:02:05 AM
.257: My 6.5 Creedmoor is a 1924 Mexican Mauser (Model 98) with an 24" ER Shaw barrel and a Boyds laminate stock. The barrel thing is a de-resonator, also called a donut, which might help with accuracy. After the initial load tests, the shot group was much wider than I expected. I lightened the trigger, put the donut on because I didn't think it could hurt anything, and the next groups were about half in inch @ 100 yards. I haven't taken it off since. I have one on a thin-barreled 243 WSSM that seems to improve accuracy.

According to Limbsaver, this is what the donut does.
The De-Resonator, a unique design with NAVCOM, is a major breakthrough in controlling the vibrations and barrel jump in rifles that cause discomfort and inaccuracy. This easy-to-install unit slips over the barrel, where it counteracts the harmonic resonance (vibrations) from the instant the bullet is fired, as it travels through the barrel and through its exit. By reducing the vibrations of the shot, even as the bullet travels through the barrel, it increases the accuracy of every shot, additionally, the De-Resonator also aids in target acquisition due to its ability to decrease barrel jump/walk at the shot
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: .257 on November 26, 2017, 05:20:34 AM
Eford, thanks for the reply. I have never seen or heard of the barrel de-resonator
But than l think l live under a bigger rock than most. Heck l was 58 when l bought my first weatherby  ::)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on November 26, 2017, 08:25:07 AM
I have to differ a little bit long range elk hunting,  it's catching favor in AZ and other western states.  Long range hunting in general has been taking off for quite awhile for AZ Coues deer hunting (tiny deer)  shooting at extreme ranges across canyons and from one mtn to another.  The TV shows are definitely pushing the long range hunting and TV's far more exposure. We have been shooting longer ranges that pre-dates these shows you just don't hear about it.   I shoot longer ranges as does almost all my friends that hunt Coues deer in fact a couple of our friends have taken Coues at 1200 to 1400 yds using 6.5 - 06 Ackley Improved,  they do use ballistic programs on their phones and they do practice.   In fact  and I'm guessing his age around 80 year's old one local gun smith that makes some of these 6.5x06's can shoot  under 10 inches @ ranges of 1100 yds and these are not super fancy rifles mostly rem 700 actions with good barrels. Most of our friends use 7mm rem mags, 300 mags, even 30-378's, a few odd balls 300 panther's, the Ackleys and others,  this has been going on for years.  You would think whow a 30-378 for a deer that's about the size of a big german shepard is a little over kill,  it is,  but that's not why guy's use them it's because of the  hit factor increases,  Long range Coues hunting   is almost always a hunting with multiple people guy's and girls or in pairs one spotting and one shooting to be successful or rather being able to walk to a small critter in heavy brush 500 yds plus and being able to find it without help guiding you to the animal.    Hunting elk at long ranges is becoming more and more popular for the every day Joe, whether it's right or not is up to that person,  in fact I was just talking to a couple of guy's from a southern state that were hunting western New Mexico in a primo unit and they  took several very nice bulls in their hunting party that came in from at ranges around the 700 yd mark.  Custom guns and guy's that can shoot.  Is it doable you better believe it and it's growing.   My wife shoots 5" groups at 600 yds and I haven't really trained her that much.  One of my close G & F friends hunts elk in his favorite canyon where shots are way out there 700 - 800 yds or more.  He is now using  LLamas to get them out.  He uses a  stock 7mm  Rem mag,  Rem 700 with a 4.5 x 14  Leupold with a CDS dial and myself having shot it ,  it's accurate enough.  This guy does not shoot every day or even every month, but he's a good shot with a good rifle.  I don't like hunting at these really long ranges other than Coues deer, but I'm fully capable of wacking an elk at 1000 yds if I ever decided to.   Hell we were shooting 1000 yds targets with M1 Garands with iron sights of course the targets if memory serves me were about 6 ft by 6 ft .  I'm still surprised how accurate these old war horses are with good ammo.                                                                       
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: musicman on November 26, 2017, 02:11:22 PM
The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed to be a very accurate, extremely long range.... target round.  As a hunting cartridge, it is in the 7mm-08/.260 Remington category.  Most of us would not use either of those for really long range elk hunting.  They do not have for the most part, the oomph necessary to put down a really large game animal at long distance.  I myself would not try it.  I would go with my .300 Weatherby/Winchester, .338 Win.mag., or my .375 Weatherby.  And even then, I would do a LOT of practice shooting at long distance, to make sure I was on target.  Past 500 yards, even with those big cases, you are starting to "lob" the projectiles.  MM
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: PARA45 on November 26, 2017, 04:03:04 PM
Bad & eford, beautiful rifles!  Thanks for the gun porn.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: eford on November 27, 2017, 05:18:09 AM
.....I myself would not try it.  I would go with my .300 Weatherby/Winchester, .338 Win.mag., or my .375 Weatherby.  And even then, I would do a LOT of practice shooting at long distance, to make sure I was on target.  Past 500 yards, even with those big cases, you are starting to "lob" the projectiles.  MM

The hunting shows advertising how well a certain outfitter takes care of your every need and guides you to within 600ish yards of an animal are BS to me. I could care less how well someone can be fed when they're hunting and the programs don't emphasize the skills of a hunter----such as get close. When that can't happen, I don't like the fact the same programs make it look like a +300 yard shot is easy. It is not easy. It takes a lot of practice, even when you think you know what you're doing the "buck fever" is hard to overcome. The long shots really do fall as if they were lobbed in from the other side of the county.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: dubyam on November 27, 2017, 05:28:17 AM
You're right, eford, on shooting at distances out beyond 100-200yds. Most hunters and shooters (probaby >98%) don't practice beyond 200yds with any regularity, if at all. Practice from field positions (shooting sticks, prone from a backpack as a rest, kneeling and braced across your knee, etc.) Is a requirement for being good at these shots afield.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on November 27, 2017, 09:45:28 AM
I've had the long range hunting discussion with friends and acquaintances for quite a few years,  originally I was against it but have now softened my stance as the years go by.  The logic being and I've seen this many times out hunting where un-trained,  buck fevered,  hunters just sling lead at pretty close ranges under 100 yds and still miss or wound the animal.   A friend made me re-think about how he was long range elk hunting,  basically he said you have slob hunters everywhere you go whether it's a guy slinging lead at close in deer, or a guy that misses the shot at long range and archery is even worst.  There is a certain amount of wounded animals no matter how careful we as hunters as a whole see every year.  I don't like it , but that's the facts and you are not going to change it,  unless you set, and test  each hunters  marksman ship skills pass or fail  in the whole country reducing probably by a lot the amount of wounded animals.   Getting a guide license in some countries you got to shoot and pass to get your license.  These little hunter education courses given out by the states are fine , but not exactly comprehensive where shooting skills under different circumstances are mandated.  When I was 10 years old in an old Army  Cavalry barn on Fort Apache Az we were taught to shoot NRA courses and must pass to be able to quality for hunting big game at this young age,   later in life the state went to it's own hunter education courses which I went thru anyway just for fun. Us old timers came from a hunting society where in my case  took our guns out behind the Jail which was behind our house and blazed away with our 22's, when we ran out of ammo we went to the little gas station cady corner from our house and bought more ammo,  no one thought anything of it.  I guarantee if you seen this jail back before it was torn down there is no way you would want to be held in this hoos gow , 2 ft  concrete walls, open bay, one wood stove, and thick flat iron slats where the windows would be just about  like the old Yuma territorial prison was built.    My point is we don't have the firearms training as a whole for young kids anymore it's tabo in circles.  Anyway I'm convinced today especially with today's way better optics, accuracy enhanced rifles,  ballistic programs ,  better ballistic bullets and ammo and with the right training and practice almost anyone can be trained to shoot much long ranges if they were to take an interest in it.  I always figured a persons max big game  range is a 9 " paper plate if you start missing that 9" plate in whatever shooting position you may shoot from  you better get closer,  bearing in mind you are using a powerful enough gun to get the job done with energy to spare.  I taught my kids with 9" balloons  on strings staked at different ranges in the ground , instant gratification when they hit them, and they move in the wind,  great practice, most everyone can do it at shorter ranges from a bench, but standing, prone, kneeling and sitting it can become quite humbling, but it trains you to shoot or not, making you think about the shot,  and get closer.  There are people that are really really good at shooting long ranges I probably see them more up here because of what we do and sometimes the very open country where you are not going to get any closer to that elk with out him seeing you.  Some guy's will say walk away for another day that's ok for me we live and hunt here,  but other guy's sling lead, take chances, or they learn to shoot long ranges.  100-200 yds on deer if they are still I'll shoot off hand if I don't have a rest,  elk are huge by comparison 300-400 yds I can do off hand if they are broadside not moving,  and I haven't been drinking a lot of coffee,  I much prefer taking a rest of some type  but there are times rests are not an option,  people will say that's not right well that's ok no one is asking them to do what we do.  Coues deer hunting can be as easy as driving down the road or more than likely getting close is not happening, they will sit there and let you walk right by if you don't see them which usually takes hours behind the bino's and spotters.  I get a kick out of watching these little deer hunkered down in the brush and some hunters decides to walk this super thick vegetation and see if they can kick out a nice coues buck not knowing where they are, about the time the hunter passes the bedded down little deer the buck decides it's safe and get's up and sneaks away.  On average from where we hunt you are looking at a min of 350 yds to  much farther and how far are you comfortable shooting, best to be geared up for 500 to 800 yds,   and there ain't no frekin way the majority of even good hunters are going to sneak up on them,  more than likely in these brushy mtns you can't even walk thru you might kick out a rattle snake or sit on one, maybe spook a mtn lion,   they don't call them the grey ghost for nothing.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: danno50 on November 27, 2017, 12:35:10 PM
You're right, eford, on shooting at distances out beyond 100-200yds. Most hunters and shooters (probaby >98%) don't practice beyond 200yds with any regularity, if at all. Practice from field positions (shooting sticks, prone from a backpack as a rest, kneeling and braced across your knee, etc.) Is a requirement for being good at these shots afield.
I'll echo the same thoughts. Especially with all the hype about long range rifles, superior ammo, wind, elevation, drop compensation laser scopes that are all the rage. The average and below average shooters/hunters are tempted more and more to take shots only their equipment is capable of handling. Long as they can hit moa at 1 and 200 yards from the bench, they'll let their equipment and ballistics charts extrapolate everything past 200 yards. I'm sure there are some legitimate competitive long range shooters/hunters on our forum, but they probably fall into the 2% category that have practiced for years. Kudos to them. Wounding a game animal should weigh heavy on the minds of all good hunters at any considered distance. 
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: badsection on November 27, 2017, 03:04:38 PM
The flight time of the bullet alone gives the critter a second or more to move unless you have it super glued to a spot at 1000 yds.  :) Yea, I know a few of us are world record breaking marksman! Buck fever at 500 yds.? Try being eyeball to eyeball at 20 yds.!
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on November 27, 2017, 05:00:02 PM
We have been close many many times almost trampled by an elk herd one year when my son was 11 years old, on his first hunt at Sipe wildlife area in an old hay field we sneaked in before daylight using a very small creek bank then I saw the image of a cow elk above us and told my son as soon as it get's light we are going to climb up the little rise and see if you can get a shot,  little did I know there were other hunters on the other side of the field and when we crested the slight elevation the field was on,  shots rang out not from us,  the elk saw us and didn't know what to do and then ran in circles around us,  the ground shook, I'll bet there were 200 or so elk in that field , bulls , cows, calfs it was an interesting morning.   I literally drove my buddy in the middle of a small elk herd kind of by accident  in New Mexico on a muzzle loader hunt and of course one shot he missed the whole 25 animals , couldn't believe it.   Been chased and mock charged by black bear,  cornered a mtn lion  by mistake in an abandoned cowboy line shack he could have swatted me so fast you couldn't believe,  the hair on the back of my neck was standing and didn't have a gun on me I left it in the truck, my buddy said get the gun from the truck and go get him,   I told him you want him you go in there,  we tossed rocks at him and finally gave up to go scout for elk. That was one pissed off kitty.  Called in mtn Lions and bears with an old wooden  lohman mouth call.  While turkey calling a pack of wolves howling back they saw us.  While elk hunting one wolf eyeballing my wifes elk in the back of the truck she shot earlier in the evening and that wolf howled all night in camp keeping my wife up which in turn kept me up.  I've had vermin try to get in my lap when varmit calling,  Turkey calling we sometimes get deer and elk to come rather close to see what all that racket is,  you can smell an elk before they get on you.  More than once I've had bear following me,  finding steaming bear crap in my foot steps on the way back out.  Had my neighbors  leather jacket ripped up  on his body from a mtn lion because he got too close with the dogs. They don't like shooting female mtn lions bad for business.  Had a frekin 2000 pound male buffalo with his cows  tear down a fence to get to me because I got stupid with him.  That one kind of scared me.  3 times in one year the family had bear encounters once with my wife , daughter and I out elk hunting,  once when my daughter, friend and I were out scouting for elk  a bear  in the bottom of the little canyon chased my daughter up a little hill to where we were,  and once when my son while archery turkey hunting thought he heard a  bull elk tearing up a tree and found out it was an angry 400 pound male black bear that didn't give his ground and came after him and then stopped, my son had one arrow left,  he now carries a hot loaded 45 acp  or long colt in the field even when bow hunting. Had one of the neighbors horses out in her field along with ours and bull elk stuck her mare in the neck with his antler had to call the vet and stich her up.   You are right eyeball to eyeball can get at little interesting.     
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: 224KING on November 27, 2017, 07:35:01 PM
Your gonna have to get a publicist if you keep making posts that long.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on November 28, 2017, 07:30:52 PM
Yea I know long posts.   
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Downeast on December 03, 2017, 04:34:05 AM
I own 3 6.5 Creeds. One in a Vanguard, one HOWA heavy barrel, and a M70 with a Krieger barrel. The 6.5 Creed was originally designed as a LR competition round and not as a hunting round. That came later. High BC bullets are the key. I have killed whitetails with all three of these rifles out to several hundred yards but I find the 6.5 CM more fun to plink steel at 1,000 yards than as a hunting round. It's fairly inexpensive to load, low recoil, and is extremely accurate. I do a lot of target shooting (hunting season is relatively short and a dozen or so rounds of just about any caliber is all I need to fill the freezer) so it fills a nice niche for me. I actually looked at the 6.5-300 for a short period of time but luckily my brain kicked back in and I came to my senses. I understand that it is a fabulous hunting round, but I just couldn't justify the cost of handloading it. Besides, I doubt the barrel would stand up to our local neighborhood FU class (don't ask ;D) competition shooting (lots of rounds downrange in a relatively short time) but the 6.5 CM does fine. I don't own a 243/6mm at the present time but if I decide to go that route I will probably go with the 6 mm Creedmoor. Off the shelf twist rates are great for heavier bullets, something that your standard .243 cannot deal with. The 6 CM is already beating the 6.5 CM in some competitions.

So, if you want a tack driver that is easy and relatively cheap to load for and is really fun to shoot I would recommend the 6.5 CM. It will do in a pinch on deer too, but for deer hunting I generally pick up my .257 Bee.  8)
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: 224KING on December 03, 2017, 05:43:54 AM
I own 3 6.5 Creeds. One in a Vanguard, one HOWA heavy barrel, and a M70 with a Krieger barrel. The 6.5 Creed was originally designed as a LR competition round and not as a hunting round. That came later.



Yea,about 15 minutes later.

You know when car racing started?When the second one was built.LOL
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: terminator on December 03, 2017, 06:17:14 AM
Rate the 3 you have for accuracy Downeast.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: northern hunter on December 03, 2017, 06:49:04 PM
Often wondered about the Creedmoor but I have a Swede it is getting sent to Corlanes in Dawson Creek BC to get an extra 2 inches put on the barrel so I can benefit for the case over the 260. Have a friend in the foothills that shoots wolves with his Creedmoor with good success in the spring when his cow are calving. I was going to buy a Creedmoor but cost of ammo was about $5 A box more than the Swede, now that I handload again I can shoot either and it will be just as cheap the 129 hornady interlock leaves a hole the size of a golf ball both sides in a whitetail.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: .257 on December 04, 2017, 04:23:00 AM
Often wondered about the Creedmoor but I have a Swede it is getting sent to Corlanes in Dawson Creek BC to get an extra 2 inches put on the barrel so I can benefit for the case over the 260. Have a friend in the foothills that shoots wolves with his Creedmoor with good success in the spring when his cow are calving. I was going to buy a Creedmoor but cost of ammo was about $5 A box more than the Swede, now that I handload again I can shoot either and it will be just as cheap the 129 hornady interlock leaves a hole the size of a golf ball both sides in a whitetail.

Depending on what action your Swede is built on, if its an older action the PSI needs to stay in the 45,000- 46,000 range where as the Creedmore with modern actions are being loaded to PSI in the 59,000 range
If you have a modern action, than you can research and find some of the loads for the modern actions, with PSI in the 57,000 range. But use caution and make sure your action can handle the higher PSI

Either way an animal will never know the difference from a Swede and a Creedmore
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: northern hunter on December 04, 2017, 05:42:17 PM
Sako model 75 is the rifle. I also have a T3 lite in the same , but was going to leave the Sako as is the T3 will be the one getting the build done . I am loading both of these to around 61000 with no problems so for both are modern actions Sako tests both the tikka and Sako with proof load of 72000 if they don't handle that they don't leave Finland.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: .257 on December 04, 2017, 07:03:58 PM
Either of those action can be loaded to higher PSI than most manuals. Do some research online and you will find lots of loads that will be faster than the 6.5 creedmore or the 260 rem. The long range guys have started loading it so there is a good place to start your search for loads

Just use caution
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: northern hunter on December 04, 2017, 07:28:23 PM
I have a Superforance load that is max load for the Creedmoor with 123 sst and it is accurate in the tikka, had to use mag rifle primers to set powder off. It is 49.5 grs
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: Downeast on December 04, 2017, 10:50:05 PM
Rate the 3 you have for accuracy Downeast.

The old M70 with the Krieger barrel. Thanks to some load data from Eric it will shoot 1/4" groups at 100 yards when they old man has a good day. ;) The Howa #6 heavy barrel and the Weatherby Vanguard S2 surprisingly shoot about the same. I shot this group at 500 yards with the Vanguard one day with factory Hornady Match ammo. This was with the rifle straight out of the box with a 10X SWFA SS scope.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: zonie on December 05, 2017, 12:42:52 AM
Without showing any pressure in an S2 Vanguard  I can get a little over 3000 fps with a Hornady 129 gr interlock and a 140 gr interlock @ 2850 fps  &  RL17 powder & quick load program.   I could probably go hotter , but have since backed off the loads to 2950 & 2800 fps respectfully.  I do have a small ring Swedish Mauser  96 in 6.5x55  wonderful cartridge.  I know from a gunsmith friend and you were to use a 98 action you can push a 6.5x55 Ackley improved right on the  velocity heels of the 6.5x284.  The small ring 96 as well as it is build I wouldn't try hot rodding it too much they are just not as strong as the 98's.       
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: eford on December 05, 2017, 03:42:30 AM
Zonie: I'm getting those same velocities from my 6.5mm Creedmoor with RL-17 and 129gn SSTs.
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: kerry257 on December 07, 2017, 05:13:55 PM
bought one, but sold it,,,dont think it was as good as my 6.5x55s, i reload for them of course,,,the 6.5 creedmore is about the same as a good load in the old 257 roberts,,,but for me the creedmore was overrated,,,,,
Title: Re: 6.5 creedmoor
Post by: danno50 on December 08, 2017, 07:45:47 AM
Welcome to the Nation Kerry, and your not alone in that opinion. Shooters who own 6.5x55's probably won't see a need to purchase a duplicate cal. for the extra fps/mv gain. Especially those hunters who aren't interested in long range game shooting.(the Swede still carries 1377 ft.lb with the Hornady 140 gr SST to 400) New shooters/hunters grab on to words like Precision, and the word Creedmoor evokes visions of making miraculous long shots and never missing HA Ha. As has been mentioned, those who are new to the sport will take the bigger piece of the pie while aficionados of the 6.5's will have their own rationale for filling a niche or a non niche in their arsenal.