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6.5-300 Wby Ballistics

danno50

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6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« on: October 01, 2015, 09:25:31 PM »
Ballistics now available for comparison of the 6.5-300 Wby to other Wby calibers, and I added the Nosler 26 ballistics chart. Scroll up and down on the Nosler chart. How about some comments:
 http://www.weatherby.com/media/weatherby/ballistics.pdf

http://www.26nosler.com/_media/26Nosler_Comparison-Charts_Low-Res.pdf
DosEquisShooter

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2015, 04:52:28 AM »
The thing that jumps out to me with the 6.5-300 is the awful BC of the A-frame 140 grain used in the factory offering.  The chart indicates the BC is .401 which is very low for a 140 gr 264.  The 140 Bergers have a BC of .612 which would make the 140 Berger as flat shooting out to 500 yards as the 127 and 130 grain factory offerings.  I suspect from 500 yards and beyond the 140 Berger would be much flatter.  Nosler's new 142 grain 264 Long Range Accubond has a BC of .719.  The heavier, high BC bullets are where this cartridge really shows out. 
BPH

danno50

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2015, 05:22:49 AM »
BPH, Does Nosler make any other high BC bullets in the 6.5 category, and if not, since the A-Frame is now an in-house item, couldn't Wby at some point purchase Berger bullets and do the same thing?

Addendum: I found the Nosler line up and their 129 ABLR BC is .561 and your right, they have a new offering in a 142 gr spitzer with a BC of .719, which I doubt they would make available to Wby since they have a vested interest in the 26 and 28 Nosler.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2015, 04:41:05 AM by danno50 »
DosEquisShooter

Blackbear3

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2015, 06:29:19 AM »
I have been looking at reloading components as I went from store to store trying to order a 6.5-300. For some reason there were very few boxes of .264 bullets of any kind on the shelves, and no ABLR's of any kind. The 142 gr ABLR would definitely be a bullet I would like to try, but I guess Noslers own loaded ammo gets first priority. I would guess Weatherby searched for someone to supply the necessary bullets for there in house ammunition and that's why the swifts were used.
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Doug-NRA Life Member

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2015, 06:40:28 AM »
The 6.5-300 has some impressive ballistics to say the least.  When I get mine I want to try the Nosler ABLRs and see how much better it makes the ballistics. 

Blackbear3, I get the vast majority of my components from www.MidwayUSA.com since they're cheaper most of the time and usually have what I want in stock. 
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Chris

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2015, 07:58:29 PM »
I will look at Walmart the next time I go and see what all they have.
Chris Kiefner

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eford

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2015, 08:15:43 PM »
I'm an admitted "fan" of Swift bullets. The A-Frame is probably the toughest copper and exposed lead point bullet out there. It has never been one to be considered as a long-range shooter. The Scirocco II is much better for that due to the highest BC you'll find in a .26 caliber bullet at 130 grain area. The A-Frame is well suited for the heavier game and shorter ranges.
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Marishka

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2015, 07:19:09 AM »
The muzzle velocity with the factory ammo rages from 3,395 to 3531 fps.
 http://www.ammoland.com/2015/10/weatherby-introduces-the-new-6-5-300-weatherby-magnum-2/#axzz3nVwM8ngZ

Marishka

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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2015, 07:27:07 AM »
Does anyone have any data on a /.270-300 Weatherby Magnum. That is a rifle I bought from Purple Fox. I have no idea what the ballistics are. I would think that it also blows away the .26 Nosler.

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2015, 08:37:45 AM »
Thanks for the charts Dan.I agree with Blake on the heavier high BC bullets.It will really shine then.Looking at the chart with the 270wby by it I wonder how this will affect 270 sales.
Roger
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Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2015, 08:51:48 AM »
So it appears to be less than 100 fps faster than the 270 Weatherby with 130 and 140 grain bullets...correct?
JK

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2015, 09:40:04 AM »
You would be correct.100 fps is 100 fps though.But that is not telling the whole story.Look at the drop of the higher BC bullets in the 6.5-300 vs the 270.The chart as mentioned does not have the higher BC bullets that us reloaders can use in the 140 grain for the 6.5.True it want make much difference if you are only shooting 100-200 yds.Sometimes long shots are required.I don't advocate the really long shots unless they are practiced.But if one does and is proficient why not.Same as with the 270 Wby and others.Just not as much variables with the 6.5-300 with the speed and high BC 140 bullets.
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2015, 10:29:13 AM »
With 130 grain bullets (relatively close bullet designs), the difference in drop is ~ 2" at 500 yards between the 270 Weatherby and 6.5-300 Weatherby.

I'm just saying...and I'm all for new cartridges and rifles...you're paying for a negligible performance difference. A 100 fps gain is around a 3% gain in velocity...nothing you or any animal will ever notice. Additionally, the 6.5-300 is built on a full length magnum (375 length) action (heavier) and obviously burns considerably more powder.

I know I sound like a negative person here and I'm even a Weatherby fan, but frankly...the 26 Nosler is a better overall cartridge/rifle design. I'm not a particular fan of the 26 Nosler either, but even less of a fan of the 6.5-300. I see the draw and appeal of having a new rifle and cartridge, but ehh...$2300 for it?

You could go buy a used rifle chambered in a 300 Weatherby (lots of choices there) and re-barrel/re-chamber at half the cost if you really have to have it. You could have it months before the first, new Mark V gets shipped out.

I can understand all of the excitement and hype, but a careful study of the numbers indicates this isn't something earth shattering. Like I said earlier, search on "Lazzeroni 6.71 Blackbird" and you'll see this concept has been around for at least a decade...and John Lazzernoni dropped it from the lineup.
JK

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2015, 10:49:39 AM »
I can't recall ever shooting a Lazzeroni, but I've heard they don't tend to be very accurate.  Roy Weatherby and others have worked with this round in a time of different reloading components.  The .277 bullets available tend to have lower ballistic coefficients than the bullets on both sides of it. (.264 and .284)  I think you have failed to see the point of this new round, and maybe you don't understand how BC comes into play at long ranges.  You are trying to make the classic apples vs. oranges argument.  Do you understand that the 7mm Wby is superior from a ballistic long range standpoint than the nearly identical 270 Wby simply because of the BC of the bullets they fire?  The argument you are trying to make is ridiculous.  Also, you say the Nosler rifle is a better design.  Probably a matter of opinion, but please lets hear it.  While you are at it I want to hear how the 26 Nosler is a better cartridge design.
BPH

Re: 6.5-300 Wby Ballistics
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2015, 06:24:16 PM »
Those are all fair questions - I'll answer them.  First, I have a friend and co-worker who owns a Lazzeroni 7.21 Firebird and although expensive...it isn't inaccurate.  I'm not advocating Lazzeroni, I was just saying that the ultra fast 6.5mm cartridges are not a new idea.  John Lazzeroni dropped the 6.71 Blackbird because very few customers wanted it.  There is the 6.5 STW and 6.5 Ultramag wildcats that are both faster, but again...not very popular.

I perfectly understand how ballistic coefficient comes into play at long ranges, but the simple fact is that the vast majority of shots made on game are within 300 yards.  An infinitely small number of shots are made beyond 500 yards, so all of the concern over ballistic coefficient is largely unnecessary.  A bullet with a high ballistic coefficient doesn't transform a the shooter into a 1000 yard marksman.  I just used the 270 Weatherby as an example because the .277 bullet is much closer to the .264 than a .284.  Sure the heavier .264 bullets have a better ballistic coefficient and sectional density...but that has been the case for a long, long time.  It hasn't made the existing .264 magnums a better performer to this point and I doubt it will going forward. 

I'm not a big fan of the 26 Nosler either, but yes, I do think the 26 Nosler is a better cartridge design.  The big difference is that the 26 Nosler fits in a standard length action versus the magnum (375) length action required for the 6.5-300 Weatherby.  This translates to a lighter rifle (and it is).  Also, it is a beltless cartridge, so it headspaces off the shoulder versus the cartridge belt.  Early reviews and reports indicate the 26 Nosler is very accurate - we'll have to see how accurate 6.5-300 Weatherby proves to be.  Lastly, from a pure economics standpoint (part of a good design), the rifle is ~ $500 cheaper and ammunition is ~ 30% cheaper. 

I've used a 6.5mm magnum cartridge on game in the field, so I speak from experience.  I still own that rifle, but I think the 7mm Remington Magnum, 7mm Weatherby Magnum, and 270 Weatherby Magnum (I own all three) are all much better performers on a bigger range of game.  I've even used the 6.5 mm Swift Sirocco II 130 grain on game.  It is a good bullet, but not on thin-skinned game at high velocities.  It has a thicker jacket and doesn't expand well on thin-skinned game. 

Again...I understand all of the excitement and interest in a new cartridge - I'm all for everyone going out and buying the new cartridge and rifle.  Numerous companies have introduced high velocity 6.5mm cartridges only to have them fade into obscurity not due to poor bullet ballistic coefficients, but poor performance in the field.  As they say, those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
JK