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Never bow hunted

mikhail2400

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Never bow hunted
« on: August 12, 2016, 08:35:37 AM »
I have never in my life bow hunted. I was allways a rifle guy and just didnt like all the pulling and short range stuff but lately ive really been considering it. I love the look of the new bows they have out. My problem is i know very little about bow hunting so im hoping yall can help me out some.
What would be a good starter bow for someone like me?

What type of sight should i consider? (I have a good idea how the pin sights work just have never used them)

Do i need a stabilizer and if so what size?

What type of arrows and tips do yall reccomend? (keep in mind ill probably lose 8 out of 10 on the first day)

Next to last question; Should i just get a crossbow and say the heck with it?

Last question; what brand bow do yall reccomend? (Since as far as i know Weatherby doesnt make a bow ill get multiple responses here.)

P.S Lets keep in mind i on a tight budget. May even look for a used bow on craigslist or local trade sights.
"The shot of the century" June 27th 1874, Billy Dixon shot an Indian standing beside Chief Quanna Parker from "about a mile away" ending the 2nd Battle of Adobe Walls
The shot was made with a borrowed Sharps 50-90. He didnt think his own 45-90 Sharps had the range.

Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2016, 10:21:51 AM »
I'd suggest finding an archery store, the options are limitless. My last bow was a Bowtech, and after a case and all the goodies I spent over $1,700. PSE, Bowtech, Matthews and Diamond are all good brands. You need to be fitted so you have the correct draw length, etc. A decent cheap starter package is around $600, crossbows are just as expensive and are not legal were I hunt. The first deer I harvested was with a bow, archery hunting definitely made me a better rifle hunter. If your serious about taking up bow hunting, you might want to join the Bowsite. They have an excellent bow hunting forum, though a lot of them are snobs towards rifle hunters. Good Luck!!!
We stand for the Flag, and we kneel for the fallen!!!

Doug-NRA Life Member

PARA45

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2016, 11:03:38 AM »
What would be a good starter bow for someone like me?  If I was you, I'd start with a used bow.  You'll save about 50% then getting a new one. 

What type of sight should i consider? (I have a good idea how the pin sights work just have never used them).  Any of the pin adjustable sights are good.  I have trophy ridge, and they are good to go and not expensive. You'll also need an arrow rest, a D-loop, a peep sight, and an arrow quiver.  You'll also need some field tips to practice.

Do i need a stabilizer and if so what size?  yes, and it will depends on the bow.  I'd say, when you find a bow, try several at the archery store, and see which one stabilizes your bow better. 

What type of arrows and tips do yall reccomend? (keep in mind ill probably lose 8 out of 10 on the first day).  All the new arrows are carbon fiber, and range from $2.99 to about $10 or more.  Your dealer will be able to recommend some arrows, and what I did was buy a dozen, and I practice with 6, and hunt with the other 6.  Broadhead types are a matter of opinion.  Today's broadheads are awesome, and will poke through a deer with no problem.  I use fixed ones, and I've heard mix reviews on the mechanical broadheads.   

Next to last question; Should i just get a crossbow and say the heck with it?  it is easier to master than a bow.  A bow you'll have to practice to get proficient.  There are a lot of instructional videos on you-tube and you can learn a lot from them.  You'll also need a release for your bow, and they can range between $40-$120, depending on the type & style you get.  Here in GA I'm not sure if the bow & crossbow can be used during the same season.  You may have to check on that.

Last question; what brand bow do yall reccomend? (Since as far as i know Weatherby doesnt make a bow ill get multiple responses here.)  I have an Elite Energy 32 & a Bowtech Carbon Icon, and I like them very much, and I prefer the Bowtech because it is lighter, but both my bows are about the same.   Obsession bows are made here in GA, about 20 min from where I live.  My son just switch to them, and he likes them a lot.  The bows Blackbear recommended are great also.  Today's bows are all great, it all depends on what you want, speed, name brand, small bows 30", etc.  It's not as complicated at it seems, but you can easily get overwhelmed.  Archery hunting will make you a better rifle hunter.  One because the deer is on top of you for archery, so your scent and your movements will have to be spot on, or you'll never see anything. 

I hope this helped, and if you still have questions, shoot me an e-mail or an IM. 

danno50

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2016, 06:07:44 AM »
I've never bow hunted either(tore my rotator cuff playing tennis late 70's) I tried it in the 90's, but even a 55 lb draw weight, after a half dozen shots, my shoulder strained too much. I happened to see a commercial yesterday that caught my attention, so I looked it up and thought I'd post it. Some bow hunters won't accept it in their sport, but for someone like me, it makes it doable, and affordable. Kinda of radical, but cool looking.
 http://www.barnettcrossbows.com/crossbows/2016-new-products
DosEquisShooter

galamb

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2016, 01:34:18 PM »
If crossbows are permitted for hunting they are a good alternative, particularly for those with shoulder injuries.

About ten years back I was a dedicated, long time recurve shooter (have a beautiful custom take-down recurve that pulls about 51 pounds at my draw/30.5") - anyhow, injured my right shoulder and it never really healed well or got back full function. So while I could still pull my bow, it was the "holding" it for more then a few seconds which got painful.

Fortunately, in Ontario a "bow is a bow" and you can use a crossbow in any "bow season" so I picked up a Horton (recurve). Went with a cheaper model at first because didn't know if I would like it - I was "more traditional" in my thinking. Ended up loving it and now on my 3rd bow since then (currently an Excalibur - still don't like the pulley's).

I do sell the entire Barnett line at work. They are (decently) built but not top end - in fact their "top end" stuff is attractive to new shooters because it comes in at about 1/2 the ticket price of the competition - but ultimately there is a reason for that. But they are good bows to start with - if you stick with it you WILL upgrade and if you find it's "not your thing" you don't have over a grand invested in another "garage decoration" :)

The greatest flaw in the thinking of those unfamiliar with crossbows (including many that make game laws), is that they "assume" a crossbow gives you some great advantage over a traditional or compound bow in terms of killing power or distance - neither is true. It's "still a bow" and realistically, a 30 yard weapon.

But like anything, with tons of practice and the "right gear" you could stretch that out to 50 yards or better. I have my own range and shoot upwards of 300 shots some weeks. Even so, for me, 35 yards is the farthest I feel "ethical" shooting when there is an animal in the sights. And in practice, the furthest shot I have taken on a deer ever was 27 yards - 15 to 20 yards is far more typical.

Where the crossbow has the advantage:

I use a cocking device to pull my 150 or 175 pounds of draw weight (gets hard on the fore-arms when you have pulled it for the 50th time in an afternoon - but no issue on the shoulders - can even get a "mechanical crank" if you really have trouble) and the trigger does "all the holding" for you - you can keep it "cocked" for upwards of 10 hours.

It doesn't take much practice to get accurate (compared to "other" bows). You can use more traditional sights, fiber sights, red dot scopes (which is my preference) or even a rifle scope if you like.

And (today) they ARE fairly durable - I stayed away from compound models because they were notorious for spending more time in the shop then the field when the were first hitting the market - most of those bugs have been ironed out.

Now I actually prefer bow hunting over rifle hunting, at least for whitetail's. It's more of a (game) for me. My season isn't ruined if I don't get a deer and there is something just (satisfying - best word I can think of) about getting a deer to come within 15 yards and having it totally relaxed, totally unaware that you are there.

Graham

Ontario, Canada
The Great White North EH!

mikhail2400

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2016, 07:57:56 PM »
Thanks for the comments folks. Ill definatly be looking around for a used bow in good condition if i do decide to give the sport a try.
"The shot of the century" June 27th 1874, Billy Dixon shot an Indian standing beside Chief Quanna Parker from "about a mile away" ending the 2nd Battle of Adobe Walls
The shot was made with a borrowed Sharps 50-90. He didnt think his own 45-90 Sharps had the range.

Chris

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2017, 08:25:12 PM »
I wish I would of seen this way back when or I may have been more help.
Did you end up getting into Archery? I stopped looking at this section cause it didn't get a lot of action even though I love archery.
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2017, 08:54:50 PM »
Chris, I see you've been quite active in this part of spike camp. Do you belong to the Bowsite? If not you should check it out.
We stand for the Flag, and we kneel for the fallen!!!

Doug-NRA Life Member

Chris

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2017, 02:51:11 AM »
I am, can't remember my username or password though. I do archerytalk and tradgang as well.
Chris Kiefner

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mikhail2400

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2017, 05:23:57 PM »
Chris i just now saw your post. I havnt bought a bow yet but have been keeping an eye on craigslist and other sites for one. Im wanting one sometime before september i think.
"The shot of the century" June 27th 1874, Billy Dixon shot an Indian standing beside Chief Quanna Parker from "about a mile away" ending the 2nd Battle of Adobe Walls
The shot was made with a borrowed Sharps 50-90. He didnt think his own 45-90 Sharps had the range.

Chris

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2017, 04:06:18 AM »
What brand,draw length,draw weight and price range are you looking for? I will keep my eyes open for you and pm you if I see anything that you might be interested in.
Chris Kiefner

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mikhail2400

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2017, 02:57:41 AM »
Brand will depend on price im assuming. Being ive never been a bowhunter and have no idea if it will fit me i think i would like to start out with a low priced used bow.
Ive found several Martin Magnum Bows for around $150.00. Being this will pretty much be a trial to see how i like it i was thinking that would be a decent setup to start out with.
According to the chart my draw length should be around 27.5,
Well Chris what do you think about my plans so far? I especially want your opinion on the Martin bows.
"The shot of the century" June 27th 1874, Billy Dixon shot an Indian standing beside Chief Quanna Parker from "about a mile away" ending the 2nd Battle of Adobe Walls
The shot was made with a borrowed Sharps 50-90. He didnt think his own 45-90 Sharps had the range.

Chris

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2017, 09:38:13 PM »
Really the only Martin bows I have messed with were recurves. Not too many compound bows from them. I once bought a Bear bow from Walmart on a dare and shot deer with it. Had to have someone set my D loop up find the center for my rest.
Go to a bow shop and shoot a few and see what draw fits you best. I can draw 29" but use a 28.5" draw cause it's better for me inside a blind and when shooting from a tree stand. You get them to fit you and you will be more pleased of the outcome rather not getting a consistent anchor point. I use the crease of my mouth and the tip of my nose.
Bad thing about compound bows is the resale on them can suck if you want to get rid of one that is a couple years old but good if you want to get into it with a lot less cost invested.
Pm me if you want to talk more about bows, I will give you my email address because I keep forgetting about this section of the Nation.
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2017, 06:46:35 PM »
Go into a bow shop and most of them will let you test out some bows. Most shops have experienced archers that can help you with the basics of shooting a bow, usually they will have some trade ins you can try too. I shoot a Bowtech, one buddy a Matthews, another a Bear and my son has a PSE. No experience with Martins, I have shot a couple Hoyts recently to try out.
We stand for the Flag, and we kneel for the fallen!!!

Doug-NRA Life Member

Chris

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Re: Never bow hunted
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2017, 08:41:32 PM »
I am still shooting my Hoyt Faktor 30. Just had it restrung. I have High Country,bear,pse,bowtech,Mathews,        Hoyt and Elite, maybe one or two I forgot about. Martin is about the only ones I have really messed with. I know for a bit they had issues with their limbs but I am pretty that has been fixed. It's hard to find a Martin Dealer around me.
Chris Kiefner

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