Spike Camp

Getting into reloading

Getting into reloading
« on: February 16, 2017, 01:50:06 PM »
Been a weatherby owner for over 25 years... my boys will start shooting soon and they will have WeeBees too... so its time.. whats a good starter kit?  thanks Matt

PARA45

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2017, 02:46:47 PM »
Hey Matt, welcome to the Nation.  If you have never reloaded, I'd suggest you get a reloading manual and read the chapter that describes the reloading process. There are several options you can, and it all depends on your budget, and what calibers you want to reload.  RCBS, LEE & Hornady all have starting kids for different budgets, and some have more reloading gadgets than the others, but will basically get you started.  You'll basically need a press, reloading dies (depending on calibers you are reloading), shell holders, powder measure, scale, caliper, and priming tool.  I am sure I'm missing something here.  My first press was an RCBS, and if I had to do it again, I'd probably go with the RCBS kit.

Look at this web page, and you'll see what I'm talking about.

https://www.midwayusa.com/reloading-presses/br?cid=680

BTW, there a bunch of knowledgeable individuals in here that will more than whiling to  help you out.

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2017, 03:00:46 PM »
Thanks PARA45.. Ive been around reloading so I have the idea... done a lot of trap shooting so I know the more barbaric type of shotgun reloading... I will be reloading 300 weatherby... I would like to come up with one load for both deer and elk so if anybody would care to share that would be awesome... right now I have two weatherby ultra lights Mark V... and in a few years I will buy a third for my youngest boy.. thanks guys...

dubyam

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2017, 04:25:53 PM »
Good equipment is worth the price. That said, you can load good ammo on almost anything these days. Great ammo can be made on good equipment and with good components, and using good techniques.

I use a combination of RCBS, Hornady, and Lyman equipment, and you wouldn't be bad buying any kit from any of the three.

To add to Para's list, get a stainless dial caliper and a tumbler kit for brass cleaning. Eventually you'll want a ton of other stuff, some of which you'll use once, and some you'll use forever.

For your load, I've had great results on northern Alabama white-tails with the 180gr Nosler E-Tip over a stout charge of H1000 or IMR7828ssc. I can't imagine they wouldn't slay elk equally well.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

BlackBear3

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2017, 04:48:34 PM »
I started out with a Pacific reloading set back in 1980, and have added RCBS and Hornady accessories since then. Buy yourself a couple good reloading manuals and start reading, I would suggest the Barnes and Nosler books. If the 180 etips shoot out of your 300 Bee you will have the perfect load for deer and elk like dubyam said. Also Midway has a big sale on the RCBS line right now (Para gave you the link), in fact I am thinking of buying the new RCBS Chargemaster Lite powder dispenser and scale there. When you start reloading AVOID distractions and do everything step by step.
We stand for the Flag, and we kneel for the fallen!!!

Doug-NRA Life Member

dubyam

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2017, 06:55:23 PM »
Amen on Blackbear's admonition to avoid distractions. Seriously. Lock the door to your loading room and if anyone interrupts you, rezero your scale and triple check powder charges. Keep good notes, as you go.

One more thing - probably the best treatise on internal and external ballistics for a beginner is available at the Hornady website. Here's a link. Read it all two or three or five times. Seriously. I've read it more than a dozen times over the past twenty five years.

http://www.hornady.com/ballistics-resource
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2017, 06:40:45 AM »
IMO the RCBS or Hornady kits would be a good place to start. As for dies I have always been partial to Redding, because of the micrometer on the bullet seating die make it easy to get the OACL. They also seem to be a little better in quality that's probably why they cost a bit more but well worth the extra.

dubyam

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2017, 07:20:51 AM »
Funny how different folks have different experiences. Out of three sets of Redding dies, I have had QC issues with two sets. Both were drilled off-center. I've stopped buying Redding because of it. But plenty of folks love their stuff and have good service from it.

I agree, RCBS and Hornady are great kits. I'd throw Lyman in there as well.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

PARA45

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2017, 08:17:17 AM »
I used IMR 7828 SSC as well, and 180 grs Accubonds, on my Vanguard 300 Wby.  Took this load to Africa, and it performed as expected, and I shot some big antelopes.  I would not hesitate one bit on using this load on elk, or deer.   

You've been given some solid advise here, and obviously if you have any reloading questions/concerns, do not hesitate to check with us, and I am sure someone will have an answer for you. Good luck to ya, and keep us posted on what you decided to get. 

galamb

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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2017, 02:44:53 PM »
I'm stingy and don't load a great deal of ammo - mostly just hunting loads for my various calibers. Anything I shoot a lot of is rimfire (so don't reload) or my 223 - and I get rounds that go "boom" for barely more than I could reload myself.

So framing it that way I went with inexpensive and functional. I picked up a Lee Anniversary press kit a few years back - had the single stage press, powder measure, hand primer (in addition to the jiggy on the press itself if you want to prime that way) a good selection of shell holders and various other bits/pieces (funnel, case lube etc) and all for under 200 bucks.

Now, I agree, it's not on the "top shelf" as most of the other brands but I'm only loading maybe 100 rounds a year. So "for me" it's already more than I will ever need.

This is one of those "pieces of kit" where you can buy what suits you...
« Last Edit: February 17, 2017, 07:07:27 PM by galamb »
Graham
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Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2017, 03:12:16 PM »
I think Lee makes some of the best stuff out there, their dies for sure, and their upper end press is as good as any IMO
Mike

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2017, 03:55:51 PM »
Check out this link from a list I made for my nephew to start reloading.
http://weatherbynation.com/index.php?topic=12660.msg114885#msg114885
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2017, 08:12:46 AM »
Thanks all... good stuff  ;)

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2017, 12:02:52 AM »
I think Lee makes some of the best stuff out there, their dies for sure, and their upper end press is as good as any IMO

I know a couple of guys that still reload their ammo on the old lee classic press, the one you have to use a hammer.  :o  You can go to wrong with the brands the others have all ready mentioned. I been using mostly RCBS, with a few Redding things for years now.  8)

Rob
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Gary

Re: Getting into reloading
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2017, 10:26:45 AM »
Stick, the saying " buy once cry once" applies here.  Everyone has an opinion.  I don't know anyone who reloads who hasn't replaced some part of their reloading set-up. Quality and durability are paramount.  Research each tool extensively, not just a handful of comments.  Buy used if it is a durable tool in good shape.  In the past I've purchased reloading equipment and dies online from a few forums and most at greatly reduced prices.   For precision accuracy and fine tuned to your rifle ammo you will realize no "kit" has everything required.  There are several hunting/ shooting forums with a huge amount of info on specific reloading subjects.  Reloading is not inexpensive, but your handloads will usually shoot 1/2 size groups of factory.  Good skill to get the kids involved and they can learn along with you.  Good luck
Scott Arizona