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Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader

Michiganhunter

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Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« on: May 11, 2017, 08:06:21 PM »
Wouldn't it be nice if Weatherby came out with a long range, high velocity, super accurate muzzleloader?

With the attention to every little detail that makes Weatherby rifles and shotguns the benchmark that others strive to match, wouldn't that be something.

The Weatherby Monte Carlo stock, a 32" barrel in stainless steel or Cerakote with 3 or 4 pellets 50 grain each and 180 - 200 grain sabots. A muzzle brake to tame that recoil.

Wouldn't that be nice?
« Last Edit: May 14, 2017, 04:13:43 PM by Michiganhunter »
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Chris

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2017, 01:28:04 AM »
Yes it would be nice
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2017, 04:24:14 AM »
I like the concept of a long range muzzleloader, but the state I live in doesn't have much in the way of muzzleloader areas/seasons. Additionally, it seems like most states that have extensive muzzleloader areas/seasons don't allow the use of scopes.

Remington has a pretty cool long range muzzleloader, but in my situation...just not useful.
JK

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2017, 05:37:33 AM »
Actually I think most states allow muzzleloaders to have scopes. I would say more allow it than others. Most states allow you to use them during firearm season. My state allows smokeless powder also.
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2017, 06:47:05 AM »
Maybe its just me but if you want a long range rifle with a scope and smokeless powder why don't you use a centerfire rifle? Muzzleloading season IMO should be for muzzleloaders, no scopes, no sabot bullets, maybe inline rifles maybe. I  have no problem with long range muzzleloaders at all, I just don't think they should be used in "muzzleloader" hunting seasons.
Mike

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2017, 06:47:09 AM »
Minnesota and Colorado don't allow scopes during muzzleloader season. Minnesota does allow a scoped muzzleloader to be used during regular rifle season.
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Chris

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2017, 07:01:13 AM »
I don't own a smokeless muzzleloader now but I did have one.
I do have an inline but it leaks and I don't use it anymore. I have several caplocks which none of my caplocks have scopes. I have came close to buying another smokeless muzzleloader but I keep buying new Weatherby rifles which puts a hamper on that. I also keep wanting to get into flintlock rifles. I do have a goal to get a deer with a roundball but I only have one rifle that shoots them worth a darn and it hang fires time to time. Had it do twice one year. It wasn't one of my TC's I have yet had one with any of them.
I use anything and everything that is legal in firearm season, even a bow a couple times.
I think if Weatherby made one they would make a real pretty one.
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2017, 07:35:18 AM »
I have a CVA 50 cal cap and ball, which I have taken several whitetail and one mule deer with. I also have a Pro Hunter inline 50 cal which I put a peep sight on because I have trouble with the iron sights anymore. I have taken an elk with it. I also have a muzzle loader scope which I mount on it and have taken mule deer and antelope in regular hunting seasons. I agree if Weatherby made one it would be outstanding like everything else they do  8)
Mike

Michiganhunter

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2017, 10:16:33 AM »
The idea of a Weatherby long range  muzzleloader is to have a great looking, hard hitting, accurate rifle. Another Weatherby I could buy with a somewhat rational excuse to do so.
The older you get, the more rifles you have, you end up running out of logical reasons to buy another. This could really help the cause.
 I look at muzzleloader hunting from the perspective of more time in the woods. In Michigan our muzzleloader season starts the day after the two week rifle season ends. It starts December 1st and ends on the 9th.
In Michigan, in the area/zone I hunt you can shoot 2 bucks. The first buck can be one with 3 points on one size. That is usually a 1-1/2 year old. The next one has to be at least 4 points on one side. Basically a 2 1/2 year old or older. Knowing you are looking for a big mature buck, when other deer move through I am able to use my binoculars to scan the area they came from and watch for a big buck that is hanging back in the brush.

In certain areas of Michigan, where there are too many deer, there is an extended doe season designed to reduce the population.
This also helps the amount of time I am able to spend in the woods. As you get older, observing the behavior of animals is as much fun as taking one.
With all these reasons, I can justify buying another Weatherby.

I might even convince my wife with this logic.

Hey, Weatherby, make us a muzzleloader!!!! 
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 04:01:27 PM by Michiganhunter »
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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2017, 12:16:31 PM »
I think it would be a great idea.  I always liked the Savage smokeless muzzleloader idea, but I hear they had some lawsuits with that one.  MM

Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2017, 07:14:38 PM »
I inherited a Traditions deer hunter percussion rifle. I love it, but it too has an occasional misfire so I save my hunting for my inline. However the other day I came across an article for a company that has 209 primer adapters for percussion rifles. Here is the link http://www.warrencustomoutdoor.com/index.html. I ordered mine and should receive it this coming Monday. When I talked to them I was told that with this adapter Blackhorn 209 powder will work. My state does allow closed ignition, but some don't.

Chris

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2017, 04:29:59 AM »
I had one on one mine(209)adapter. It was awesome until I dropped the the cap and couldn't find it. I think it is $14 to replace. If you get one don't use the 777 209 primers. They were so hard to get out after firing.
Chris Kiefner

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2017, 07:33:09 AM »
Definitely a no on the 777 primers. I was told by them that they were a mess. I have clumsy fingers so I ordered an extra cap to begin with. I bought one of those magnetic primer tools for my inline and it works great for getting out the spent primers. That crazy little magnet is strong enough that if you set it on top of a box of 209's it will pick up the whole box.

galamb

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2017, 09:19:08 AM »
I belong to a couple muzzle loading forums (we don't discuss in-line stuff in either) but there is a "very few" guys that have "long range" rigs.

A long range muzzle loader - and to put some perspective we are looking at 300 to 500 yards which is "long" compared to the stuff on the market, they are using shallow rifled barrels and paper patched bullets.

I have seen the results of a couple of these (concoctions) and they are "elk accurate" at 350 yards.

The amount of practice, fiddling with charge weights, bullet selection etc to reach out into the 500/600 yard range is well beyond the average shooters level of dedication. If someone could slap together a gun that you could drop six 777 pellets down the tube, stuff down a sabot and get 500 yards "easily" there would be nothing else on the market.

But I would suggest that this would be a very very small market from a companies perspective and not sure it would be worth the time, manpower and tooling because there just wouldn't be the demand to make it financially worthwhile.

I sell black powder guns. We carry models from the current companies (Knight, CVA, T/C, Traditions etc). I sell "dozens" of the Traditions (ready to shoot kits) which go for under 400 bucks. I also sell anything "under 300 bucks". The "main" black powder market seems to be guys/gals who "didn't get their deer in the gun season" and are taking a Hail Mary shot at bagging one in extra week or two afforded them (same situation with crossbows - sell a lot of low end).

Now I'm not saying there "isn't a market" for the better quality stuff, but even in that small BP market the ratio of high end to basic entry is way over 20:1 - so if I sell a Traditions Hawken I know I will sell 20 CVA Wolf's before someone else comes in with money. And that is reflected in the stock that I keep on hand.

If Weatherby got into that market I might have two on hand, mostly to say "I have it in stock", but I can say with fair certainty, at least in my market, that it would not be a "high turnover" product for me.

And as some note, each jurisdiction has a different definition of "what's allowed" in their black powder or primitive season which even shrinks the market further. (why use a 300 yard BP gun in the "gun season" when I can use any gun?)

But there is a reason that all the brands/models that used to be in the Black Powder market aren't there anymore.
Graham
R.C.A.F (Retired)
Ontario, Canada
The Great White North EH!

Michiganhunter

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Re: Weatherby Long Range Muzzleloader
« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2017, 03:53:25 PM »
The muzzleloader rifle I am talking about does not use smokeless powder. Anyone who uses smokeless powder in a muzzleloader not specifically designed for such powder will blow up the rifle and quite possibly die.

That is why we have Weatherby rifles that uses a case and bullet.

The majority of states have specific muzzleloading seasons that allows us to use inline rifles, sabot with bullets like hornady SST and a scope. It gives hunters another season to apply for licenses in areas that are almost impossible to draw a tag during the rifle season.

My brother shot a New Mexico monster elk in such an area during muzzleloader season. He used a Remington inline with a 245 grain Barnes sabot. The shot was 324 yards measured with a rangefinder. The bull went 20 yards and dropped. This was the last day of the season at dusk.

Yes, I would love to have a Weatherby muzzleloader. I would buy such a rifle if they made one. It's because I really like Weatherby products. I like the shotguns and the rifles.

I just want another reason to buy a   Weatherby.

I am not saying that an inline is a primitive weapon like a muzzleloader from the 17 and 1800's. I understand some people believe that primitive weapons should be just that, primitive. We have primitive bows, recurve, compound and crossbows. If those are allowed and approved by that states wildlife departments, great. If a person wants to use a longbow and another loves his crossbow, go for it. I'm just saying it's another opportunity to be in the woods doing what so many of us enjoy.

If I can do that carrying a muzzleloader built by Weatherby, that's even better.

« Last Edit: May 15, 2017, 04:26:07 PM by Michiganhunter »
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