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Any reason to spend more than Vanguard Select costs for a hunting rifle?

I'm wanting a new rifle, in either 300 WBY or 300 WIN. This is going to be for mule deer, elk, and moose at, potentially, yardage out to 500. I need to be able to hit a pie plate at 500, not a golf ball. My question, and this is one that I keep wrestling with, is why should I spend the money for an Accumark if the Vanguard Select will suit me.

If the Vanguard suits you as stated you should get it.My personal preference for mag rounds is a 26 inch barrel vs the 24 of the Vanguard to get all  I can performance wise.The Vanguard should perform well for you.Keep us informed and post Picts of the gun you get and groups it shoots.
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

danno50

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Welcome to the Nation. Nothing wrong with the Vanguard Select if your looking for an inexpensive but very accurate hunting rifle period. For the savings, whats the best price you've found on the Select model, and have you actually been able to handle one or are you buying sight unseen? "why should I spend the money for an Accumark if the Vanguard Select will suit me." When you move up in price, generally you are getting additional features that sometimes only enhance the rifle, but some features actually help the shooter. Once you've compared the different options, if your still not moved to change your opinion, then the Select model is for you. I could tell you what I'd do and what I'd buy, but your question didn't ask me for my opinion on what I'd buy.
DosEquisShooter

Michiganhunter

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If you decide on a vanguard, you'll be pleased. If you go with the Mark V you will see it has a better stock, receiver, barrel, trigger, .99" or less guarantee at 100 yards. etc......
You are concerned about the extra 2 " barrel length. You might lose 50-75 fps with a 24". Then again, you might not. It depends on barrel.
I would recommend the Vanguard in the .300 wby instead of the 300 win mag. If you hunt elk or moose, the .300 Wby with 210gr. bullet traveling at 3000 fps the rifle trajectory will be flat, maintain energy down range and bullet drop out to 400yards will not be a factor.
I have both a 300 win mag and Wby and if I am hunting anything bigger than a whitetail deer and/or out west where long shots are the norm, I seem to gravitate towards the Weatherby.
If the Vanguard you choose is costing you $800, then I would opt for a Mark V in weatherguard 26" barrel and 9 lug Mark V superb magnum action and the LXX trigger is the best all for about $1300. It is the most economical way to own a Mark V. It has all the important components that makes the Mark V the best rifle out there.
If you want to keep your costs down go with a vanguard. The Wby Vanguard is still a better built rifle than most $1200 name brand rifles. The Weatherby mark V, in my opinion, is a factory gun shop custom rifle for 50% less than a known name custom rifle would cost you. I have owned Weatherby rifles since 1971. They are quality through on through.
Of course, my opinion is just that, an opinion.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2017, 05:18:57 PM by Michiganhunter »
If you are arguing with an idiot and someone passes by, they don't know who's the idiot.

I'm not seeing the Weatherby select offered in 300Wby. Only 300Win. You may have to step up to a Vanguard S2 if you want the Weatherby mag.  I'm seeing the S2's starting around $490 on gunbroker

The walmart in my town has the select for $458. But it only comes in standard calibers and maybe not .300 win. It competes with the other 300-400$ guns. Im sure its a good gun but it does have the plastic "tupperware" stock that many people, including me don't like. However, I would buy it over the other brands like Savage Axis or Ruger American.

galamb

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As a vendor I see all levels of "need and want".

If we are honest we don't "need" anything more then a Select or an Axis. Both will often shoot far better than the guy/gal pulling the trigger will ever be capable of. So that is all you "need".

When talking about "want" that is where the whole universe opens up.

If the Select suits your needs, and as stated it absolutely should, AND you would be satisfied or even happy with that, then go for it. Sitting next to my more expensive, fancier, wood stocked rifles I also have a Savage Axis 223. Why? because for shooting Coyote that's all I need. And it's accurate. And while it does have almost $1000 worth of scope sitting on top of it, it deserves it because it shoots that well.

Which would bring me to my second point. If you need to shoot out to 500 yards and you are trying to take down something other than paper or a gong you would be well served spending as much or more on your optics than the rifle itself.

The Select will give you sub-moa accuracy. So spend the money on the scope that will allow you to enjoy that accuracy when you need to reach out...
Graham
R.C.A.F (Retired)
Ontario, Canada
The Great White North EH!

dubyam

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I'll offer a couple of other considerations beyond the excellent discussion so far.

First, either rifle will perform the task as you've outlined it. Either is an excellent piece of equipment which can and will be an heirloom you can hand down later on. One will likely be worth more at both the beginning and the end. But worth is subjective.

Where the two rifles really begin to differ is in the role for which each is best suited. The Vanguard Select is a great entry level rifle (probably the best entry level bolt gun out there) and has a myriad of further customization you can do as time and budget allow, should you desire. It is also about 2lbs lighter, ready to hunt, than an Accumark. The Accumark is well suited to longer range shooting, though either rifle will, as I said, perform the task. The real differences are weight and cost. And I'd argue that if you're hiking and spot/stalk hunting, you won't love the Accumark at the end of the hunting day. They're great rifles but they're not for hunting which involves heavy hiking in rough terrain.

If you feel like you need the 26" barrel, consider a used Mark V in the Sybthetic, Fibermark, or some other synthetic stocked, sporter weight configuration. I've hunted all over my mountain deer property in northern Alabama with my sporter weight Mark Vs with no trouble at all. You can probably find a good one in 300 for $650-800. That's still nearly twice the price of the Vanguard, though.

And the advice above to spend money on the optics is the best advice here. Glass will make or break shots out beyond 300yds.
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danno50

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If you feel like you need the 26" barrel, consider a used Mark V in the Sybthetic, Fibermark, or some other synthetic stocked, sporter weight configuration. I've hunted all over my mountain deer property in northern Alabama with my sporter weight Mark Vs with no trouble at all. You can probably find a good one in 300 for $650-800. That's still nearly twice the price of the Vanguard, though.

And the advice above to spend money on the optics is the best advice here. Glass will make or break shots out beyond 300yds.
Dub convinced me, and I found a real nice Mark V synthetic inside that price range on GunBroker. Good luck on your final decision.
DosEquisShooter

How much does an accubrake cost and the install? Is the 300 WBY usable without one? Especially the Wilderness at 6 3/4 lbs.

dubyam

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I would think you'd be better served by either a lower recoiling cartridge in the wilderness, or a 300Wby in a heavier rifle. I have a 6.5lb 30-06, which runs about 7.4lbs ready to hunt, and it's very easy to shoot. But my 9.25lb 300Wbark V Stainless Synthetic, while nearly 2lbs heavier, gives me a sharper recoil impulse. Neither is uncomfortable to shoot for extended periods at the range, but I'd imagine a lightweight 300Wby would be a little harder to tolerate for longer sessions.

If I were getting a 300Wby, I'd strongly consider a synthetic stocked Vanguard in the normal weight range, rather than the Wilderness. If you just have to have the Wilderness model, I'd strongly consider something like a 7mmRemMag as an excellent option with similar capabilities but lower recoil.

I am not a fan of muzzle brakes, because I have ongoing sinus issues and am sensitive to the pressure waves given off by them. I also don't like shooting them while hunting as they are far louder than unbraked rifles. There are others who love brakes, though, so take that into consideration. Everything is a tradeoff. Recoil or noise & muzzle blast? I choose recoil.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

Re: Any reason to spend more than Vanguard Select costs for a hunting rifle?
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2018, 07:09:23 AM »
I have a S2 Vanquard in 243 and 223 and they shhot as good as my other 10 scoped rifles. I am very happy with the action, trigger, barrel and accuracy. I considering a new accuguard now in 270 win. I have been shooting and hunting for over 50 years and have stay with “non Weatherby calibers” due to the costs and choice of ammo. I live the 300 win mag for anything in North America.

danno50

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Re: Any reason to spend more than Vanguard Select costs for a hunting rifle?
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2018, 02:54:43 PM »
qwerty11's last post was July 17th and never did say what he decided.
DosEquisShooter