Spike Camp

Colt Cobra

Colt Cobra
« on: October 05, 2017, 11:17:03 AM »
I've had two guns on my list for the second half of this year (neither happen to be a Weatherby this time) and haven't gotten either yet. One has been a Colt Cobra for a new carry gun for my wife. I wanted to pick her up one as soon as I heard back in January that Colt was re-introducing it. The reviews have been very good, but I recently saw a review done by Jeff Quinn on gunblast.com, which showed some bad things (my opinion, not his).

http://www.gunblast.com/Colt-Cobra.htm

Jeff always posts a lot of closeup pictures and when I had a close look, I was really disappointed by the fit and finish (you can click on each picture for a zoom view). The barrel looks like a cheap casting, and fit around the screws was horrible, along with bad MIM production, complete with pronounced marks. It looked like a $300 gun, not a $700 one. I couldn't find one to look at in person (seems nobody has any in stock). I'm quickly steering over to a Ruger SP101 or a S&W Model 60 (except for that dang internal lock, which would come out asap) for her. I was wondering if anybody has one or has handled one and could offer an opinion before I give up on Colt. I'm wondering if they're all like that, because Colt revolvers of years ago were beautifully done. I wasn't expecting anything approaching the old Colts but geez, how disappointing if they are all like this.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 12:31:25 PM by texweatherby »
Some like cologne, I like the smell of gunpowder.

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2017, 06:43:01 AM »
The old Cobras looked identical to the Python vent rib and all. I am very disappointed that Colt would bring back a name and put it on a fake pistol that doesn't represent the quality that Colt once stood for.
The bean crunchers really blew this one.
TD

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2017, 07:42:50 AM »
Yep, was pretty sad to see the finish in those close-up shots. Couldn't believe Colt would market something like this. The S&W's and Rugers in the same price range look far better in quality. Even Taurus revolvers look better (although I wouldn't roll the dice on one of those). Silly thing is, if Colt had done build, fit and finish at least as good as S&W, yet still not quite as good as the old days, they could have set MSRP at $1400 and up and gotten it all day long.
Some like cologne, I like the smell of gunpowder.

zonie

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Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2017, 09:30:21 AM »
This new colt doesn't look like a good fit and finish.  I prefer older guns anyway.  If you can find an old colt used for a decent price it might be worth it.  Taurus makes a pretty decent little revolver and, my favorites are Smith & Wesson air weights at least for concealed carry revolvers go ( pocket guns).    These are all belly guns, short range, personal protection.  in this case a 357 mag probably isn't needed, case in point these light weight little snubbies can get your attention the first time you pull the trigger with their smaller grips and + p ammo.   I personally like the shrouded hammer or that little somewhat concealed hammer  models a little better for less of a chance of snagging on something.  Lets call it what it is none of them have great double action triggers so unless you are willing to get a very good gunsmith to smooth out the  D/A trigger  I'd  keep shots very close.  Single action mode most have decent triggers but none would compare to a really good trigger job.  A couple pf our race guns the double action is so light that we have to use federal  or win primers to ensure the gun fires due to very light hammer drop in double action mode which usually has a shorter hammer arch vs single action mode.   Personal protection guns I wouldn't lighten the trigger too much but rather make them smooth which totally enhances stacking the trigger double action mode to be more accurate and ensure you really want to drop the hammer of not.  Again this is with a lot of practice to be proficient with a D/A  revolver.   Lately I have been carrying a Colt Trooper 4" barrel in a shoulder holster ,  full power 357's,  it's heavy,  but very very accurate and totally manageable in fast double action mode as long as you know how to shoot  a double action revolver. 
« Last Edit: October 08, 2017, 09:41:30 AM by zonie »

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2017, 06:57:22 AM »
I'm going to buy one of the new Cobras but am waiting to see if a blued version comes out since I like a blued finish over stainless steel.  The old Cobras looked like the Detective Specials and the Diamondbacks looked identical to the Pythons.  I'm surprised no one commented before on their fit and am wondering if these are flukes.  I have a tough time believing Colt is going to let poor fitting be the norm because of all the time and money they invested in this revolver and they know full well it's absolutely make or break situation with the Cobras.
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2017, 10:09:01 PM »
Yesiree, I was all set to buy one too, then I had a good look at the photos on that review, which threw me for a loop and pretty much scared me off. I had been excited that Colt brought back a revolver. I can't even find one to look at though to really inspect the quality, but that barrel really looked like some crappy casting. MIM parts (most new firearms have 'em) have proven themselves, but I can't stand the mold circles and seams showing externally. Colt could have done a lot better; I think they rushed the gun to market. Really thinking about a S&W 60 (daughter carries one and I like it a lot) or a 640 and just remove the lock (640) or grind off the nub on it (60). The 640 Pro has no internal lock and a fine looking revolver, but requires moon clips and is overpriced. The Ruger SP101 is popular but not as compact and is heavier. I have a pre-lock S&W 66-2 the wife likes and I'd give her, but even as a snub nose it's just too dang big and heavy as a carry weapon; weighs 34oz. I'd still have a look at the Cobra to see for sure, if I could only find someplace that has one. The trigger is supposedly very good for out of the box.
Some like cologne, I like the smell of gunpowder.

zonie

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Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2017, 08:56:51 AM »
There are some real advantages for using revolvers with full moon clips.  A good portion of the highest level SPEED revolver shooters either buy or have their guns modified to use full moon clips.   www.cylinder-slide.com    or  www.tkcustom.com     Why because they index faster when loading and all the spent shells come out at the same time when ejected and they dump in a pile with the moon clip attached , no need to go hunt for cases on the ground.   They  are just plain faster to unload and reload.    The downside  you should use good moon clips  when you drop them on the ground sometimes the cheaper ones can bend a little causing them to bind  (if  bent) when loaded the next time and rotating the cylinder.  Moon clips should be unloaded and re-loaded with inexpensive special tools to get the job done easier (no big deal).  Same could be said when speed shoot matches and you drop a half loaded semi-auto magazine on a hard surface and it comes apart on you.  My 1911 semi auto magazines on our race guns are mostly welded bases to eliminate this problem,   use better quality  tk moon clips or others and you drop the thing on a hard surface it does the same thing,  they can bend sometimes.   You need to use fully flat moon clips in order for the cylinder not to drag when trigger is pulled.  Most everyday shooters won't have too many problem they don't ding them on the ground like speed shooters do,  it's not a high priority  anyway they are in it to win so a few bent moon clips are part of the game just as damaged semi-auto magazines.   My police buddy murdered by a drug dealer had a smith & Wesson 940 - 9mm, 5 shot revolver his son now has it,   bitchen gun but double action,   another gun is the new Ruger LCR in 9 mm,  and Taurus M905 with a hammer in 9mm.   One thing I would look at is whether you want to shoot double action only or have the option to shoot both double action and single action in the same gun,  these all use moon clips.   There are other  larger revolver models that use full moon clips.  Most old time guy's I know  that shoot fast revolver matches use 38 supers, 9x23.   even a few Smith model 610's in 10mm auto and N frame Smith's 45 acp .  You can always convert several different revolvers to use full moon clips.   One thing about 5 shot 9mm full moon clips is they are small and don't take up a lot of space in the wifes purse or your pocket,  the other large caliber and 7 or 8 shot moon clips are a little bulky but not terribly oversized.  The other thing about a good revolver is they almost never fail ,  you might get one the doesn't go bang because most likely lousy ammo,  by design you can rotate that cylinder around and hit that unfired round again and see if it goes off or not.  The other thing about revolvers  they are usually better for people that don't shoot a lot,  yes there could be something said about semi-autos until they jam and an unfamiliar person with that gun  is trying to un jam one in a stress situation is not a good day.  To be perfectly honest both styles of guns can screw up,  but the revolver is less likely.  My dad was a state police in the 1930's before he went federal,  them old farm and ranch boy's could shoot,  when the wonder nine's came out in the 80's & 90's it was like 15 rounds bang, bang, bang and shoot some more.  I would be way more afraid of an old timer with a good six shooter than someone that doesn't shoot a lot with a high capacity semi-auto especially at longer ranges.  Handguns are just harder to master and it takes time and testing to get it down and even then you got to still practice, maybe just not as much. 
« Last Edit: October 08, 2017, 10:10:40 AM by zonie »

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2017, 11:56:04 AM »
The above post is one reason I enjoy this site so much, Multi-generational experience with firearms. Doesn't matter if its rifles or hand guns, you get honest opinions from people that have used/competed or worked on so many different firearms. :)
I can't tame wild women
But I can make tame women wild

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2017, 02:42:21 PM »
The moon clips make a lot of sense for a few fast reloads, but to shoot a few boxes of ammo at the range, fooling with reloading the moon clips and the tool to do it properly seems like a lot of hassle. As far as exposed vs internal hammers, never was fond of not having single action capability or the look of internal hammer models, but they do make a lot of sense for a carry weapon since there's no hammer to catch on the draw and probably 99.9% of defense shots are taken double action anyway. There's been a lot of internet babble in recent years about not removing or disabling S&W internal locks ("Clinton locks") because prosecutors will supposedly crucify you in court, should you have to defense-fire the gun, but there is no incidence on record that I can find of that ever actually happening. My daughter IS a prosecutor and she calls BS on that. The internal lock is a STORAGE safety device, just like removable trigger locks (mostly for people that don't have safes), not a usage safety, and nobody would be expected to carry a locked up handgun for defense. S&W makes several non-lock models anyway, along with countless models from Ruger and others with no locks. Remove the lock and let a child get hold of it and then you could actually have a genuine problem just like one with no lock in the first place. It's true about some locking up upon firing (uncommon but scary) and S&W allegedly started putting in stronger springs to stop it. Not offering all this as legal advice or saying go do it, but I don't worry about it.
Some like cologne, I like the smell of gunpowder.

zonie

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Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2017, 02:37:39 PM »
In general terms my opinions and  my observations.   If you are going to carry a weapon for self defense whether it's for the two or four legged predators. I would highly suggest knowing how a person is going to carry the weapon e.g. concealed,  holster on the hip or shoulder,  in a purse, in a pocket,  whatever the case it HAS to be comfortable to carry, if it ain't comfortable you aren't going to carry for long.   That alone will dictate general type and size of weapon, it might be a small gun it might be a big gun,  you won't know that until you try a lot of different combo's of guns and carry styles.  I just bought a high dollar ankle holster for a j-frame Smith after using it for a few days I come to the conclusion it's worthless for me and went back to an old neoprene ankle holster that doesn't flop around.    If a person doesn't carry on their person,  or purse  or some other way,  it really doesn't have the same affect as someone carrying a handgun next to his car seat or other area.  The rig has to be comfortable when carrying.   With this in mind a person can base their needs on what type of gun to buy.   At times I may carry several different types of weapons semi's, revolvers, hunting types, not at the same time except maybe an ankle holster and I got a pile of holster/rigs I just don't use because they are uncomfortable. If a person is just going out to plink and not carry is a different situation.  On the other hand if a person knows they may carry for self defense they better be prepared to train on whatever weapon they choose and maintain their proficiency until you stop carrying.   This brings me to a point if a person is not willing to shoot to stay familiar with their weapon they ought to buy the simplest weapon to operate and learn and get good with that gun.  You can always further your proficiency on other guns later down the road and possible upgrades to another types and that's ok, and we are only talking about the mechanics of carrying a weapon, not the legal issues that's a whole different ballgame.   If I'm on  horse and carry a scabbard which I don't do that much anymore the rifle is set-up in front of my leg vertical butt stock up so I can dis-mount at the same time grabbing the rifle, others have the rifle set-up to come out to the rear, neither is wrong just different,  same with riding the quads  with a rifle set-up I like mine right where I can grab it usually right in front of me, other guy's like them set-up fore and aft in back,  I suppose it's a little safer that way but slower to get to.  If a person is willing to learn there really isn't any wrong gun per say as long as it's a reliable and goes bang every time.  It's what we need to do with them that will tell us  what  carry style or holster rig we need.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 02:56:32 PM by zonie »

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2017, 01:00:59 AM »
That absolutely gorgeous to die for Colt bluing on my Python, did not do well in the flood.  It was perhaps in the worst shape of any of my firearms.  It cleaned up, and is shootable, but it looks like it has had heavy carry use for thirty years.  One of my buddies suggested sending it back to Colt to have it refurbished to as new.  I don't know what I'll do.  I'll just sit on it for a year or two, and then decide.  MM

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2017, 06:27:40 AM »
I highly agree with Ron in that if it isn't comfortable you will not carry it.Hot humid weather here means a lot of shorts and tee shirts.I carry mostly small pocket rockets that fit in my back pants pocket.Keltec 32,Beretta21A,North American Arms mini revolver 22 mag.Pretty small calibers but I always have one on me.The bigger ones are reserved for truck carry.Hunting pistols are carried in a bandolier style holster. I have not seen one of the Cobras in person but will be looking to find one to check it out.
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

zonie

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Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2017, 08:39:01 AM »
Like an old master chief navy seal asked me one day what was the best gun ?   I wasn't a seal but since he knew I was into guns.  Any way I went in depth with bunch of garbage on which gun was the best and why .   I told him how to build a watch when I should have been telling him what time it was because that was the meat of the question.  I mean this in a good way he's one  crazy old master chief,   this guy was unhinged nobody messed with him,  he stared at me and said boy the best gun is the one you have in your hand, half smiling like he set me up.  Thank god we have people like this in the military I think he was the Navy version of Rambo. 
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 08:44:26 AM by zonie »

Re: Colt Cobra
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2017, 04:03:17 PM »
He's right, the one in your paw is far better than the one you wish you had that don't have.  It doesn't have to be pretty or fancy, just work at the time when you need it to, hence the communist block weapons, they're nothing to look at or write home about but they go bang every time you pull the trigger which is far more important than looks when the crap hits the fan.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 04:05:36 PM by Chris338378 »
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.