Spike Camp

6.5 creedmoor

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2017, 05:23:16 AM »
The 325WSM is an excellent round. But it is a handloader's round only, and I'd advise buying 300-500rds of brass when you get one, backus it won't always be available.
Only one source of brass from Nosler, expensive! Most of the bullets available are for the Mauser and not quite up to the velocity of the 325 WSM.  Loaded ammo is difficult to find, also.  One is available on Midway this morning.  I do have several hundred brass. My best round, so far, is with the 220gr. Swift A-Frame using RL19, again a expensive bullet. I agree, it was obsolete before it ever had a chance. My model 70 Sporter with a Zeiss is a tack driver on paper, haven't taken any critters with it. I would use it for anything most would use a .338 caliber for. The advantage of the Creedmoor is the huge selection of brass and bullets at a reasonable cost, being a cheap bastard!   ;D

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2017, 06:14:30 AM »
My 325 Winchester Model 70 Sporter with a Zeiss 3-9X  and my Savage 10BA Stealth in 6.5 Creedmoor.   :)

Blackbear3

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2017, 06:43:26 AM »
The 325 wsm would be a perfect in between for deer and elk but seems to be going the same way as my 300 SAUM. It's pretty much a hand loading only round already, but the little Remington 7 in 300 SAUM was my go to rifle for elk hunting for 15 years. I did find quite a bit of 325 WSM ammo at ammoseek Michiganhunter.  Thanks for the Saturday morning gun porn Bad.

https://ammoseek.com/ammo/325wsm
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Doug-NRA Life Member

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2017, 07:20:48 AM »
I don't get all of the 6.5 Creedmoor hype either. Yes, they have made some very good long range bullets in the 6.5 caliber, but there isn't any mathematical magic here. Physics are physics...and those laws are extremely difficult to get around.  Bottom line is if I fill a larger case with more powder behind the same bullet (all other things being equal), it will go further...faster. Projectile motion is funny that way.

I'm sure it is accurate and a good mid-sized game round. I personally don't use any 6.5 round for anything bigger than mule deer. I have a .264 Win Mag and am putting together a 6.5-300 Weatherby, but I wouldn't reach for either of them for something like elk ahead of a 7mm, .30 cal, or .338 cal.

I think the 6.5 Creedmoor is a good mid-range caliber, but certainly no better than a .260, 6.5x55, or 6.5-284.
JK

eford

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2017, 08:29:11 AM »
The wide variety of .264 caliber bullets means the whole family of 6.5mm rifles have a great chance of matching a very good hunting or match bullet to what that rifle likes. Be it a 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser or a  6.5-300 Weatherby Magnum, you really aren’t going to find one that is a failure. One has a tad more velocity than another, except for the 6.5-300 and it’s in a class by itself.

I have a 6.5mm. Creedmoor that is a fine long range hunting rifle. I wanted it to be my lightweight rifle but that didn’t work, but it is still a great hunting rifle. My Creedmoor is no easier to reload than another cartridge. Lots of brass is available, so for now things with it are easy. A 260 Rem or a 264 Win Mag can be just as good. So can a 6.5-284 Norma or a 6.5mm Rem Mag.

Whatever you hunt with, be great with it.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 08:30:46 AM by eford »
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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2017, 08:52:15 AM »
Nice looking rifle, what make is it?
What is that on your barrel?
Mike

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2017, 12:32:33 PM »
My choice isn't on that list either! 325WSM.  Shooting a game critter at those distances allows so much flight time, the critter has too much time to move! JMO! In the more reasonable 300 yds. or less, they all work!  :)



My sentiments exactly too Bad. Although I haven't shot much big game with my .325 WSM it is a very underrated round. It has all the power of the great 8mm Rem Mag in a short compact cartridge. The few critters I have shot with mine couldn't tell the difference between the two lol.
Plus one on being 300 yds or less too.
Aussie gun nut.

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2017, 02:40:40 PM »
The 6.5 Creedmoor is not a one gun solution to every hunting/shooting situation. It is accurate, fun and cheap to shoot and everybody makes ammo, dies and brass for it.  That is why we all own more than a 30-06 or a 270 Win.   ;D

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2017, 05:59:58 PM »
The 6.5 creedmoor was designed as a longer range  target round to reduce shooter fatigue vs the larger 30 cal mag's.  My wife has killed elk with her creedmoor at short range 150 yds or so, and the 129 grain hornady interlock blew right thru and exited center mass on a nice sized cow.  I personally wouldn't have a problem using a 6.5 creedmoor on any size bull elk up to around 400 yds on a broadside shot.  There in lies the problem those old bulls just don't sit there and let you shoot them a lot of the time,  they move at the wrong instant you touch off the trigger. Where the 6.5 creedmoor shines is on smaller animals such as deer and antelope at longer ranges,  they are just not as tough as elk.  Most of my friends that hunt 1000 yds elk and smaller game usually use 7mm rem mags using 160/175 grain bullets ,  a few use 300 what evers ,  NONE use berger bullets on elk,  on a perfect shot they may work but are made to come apart, and therein lies the other problem with elk as taking a lot of killing sometimes.  I prefer to break everything in the bullets path on elk and if that means reducing my shooting ranges that's what we do.  Instead of watching some un trained slob hunter just throwing lead out there  making a fool out of himself and worst wounding and not finding the animal because they are too lazy or incapable of tracking it.  The 6.5 Creedmoor is not a 1000 yd or even closer elk caliber, and was never intended as one, and that goes for any of the other cartridges in it's class.  Elk are not armored plated either, but you do need enough horse power and bullet penetration to get the job done as quickly as possible at what ever your maximum given ranges is per cartridge used, even the old 30-30 is a fine elk cartridge if you get close enough.   

danno50

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2017, 08:27:35 PM »
I think the 6.5 CM is a great little caliber that has done well for itself since it's inception. Its not the best caliber ever developed, or the do all end all rifle of all time, but I do think its got a strong following for a lot of reasons. Does it outperform the 26 Nosler or the 6.5/284, no, but it is more popular and carries itself on its own merit. Some people new to shooting and hunting want to have the same type of rifle that precision shooters have and theres nothing wrong with that as long as they research what their buying and its what they want. The fact that Weatherby developed a 6.5-300 also may give more credibility to the 6.5 CM, and it probably is about the bullets and their high BC's offering less wind drift, a bit less recoil and good accuracy at long range.(the only guys that shoot elk at 6 or 700 yards + are on TV) Anyway the OP never asked if it was a good long range elk rifle, someone just threw that into this thread later, so its not a 340 or 338, or a 6.5-300, but its a great long distance target rifle, and probably a legitimate 3 and 400 yard big game cartridge(no big bears) 
 Heres a couple of snippets from a magazine review:   

6.5 Creedmoor Earns Its Rightful Place:
Who knew Hornady’s 6.5 Creedmoor would cause such a stir? The combination of cost, availability, ballistic performance and outright success from the world’s best precision shooters all combined to create an endorsement seldom seen in the ammo. Let’s face it, for every caliber worth its weight, there are 10 more with minor differences being produced, perhaps because somebody wants their name on a cartridge. The 6.5 Creedmoor is not one of those. Even the better-performing 6.5×47 Lapua, which got its start in 2005, doesn’t get the same love as the Creedmoor. The 6.5 Creedmoor was, until Weatherby’s 6.5-.300, the first buzz-worthy cartridge I can recall since the .260 Remington.
As a result of such an endorsement, and because so many precision shooters and marksmen in general also hunt, the popularity shift from precision shooting to hunting and even modern sporting rifles was inevitable.
I mention MSRs because the 6.5 Creedmoor grew in popularity in both bolt-action and semi-automatic MSR platforms exponentially over traditional wood-stocked classics, although Ruger produces quite a nice M77 Hawkeye Predator Rifle and Weatherby also offers a nice Vanguard. While I am not sure if this trend is because traditionalists like to stick to classic mainstream calibers or not, I do know the 6.5 CM short action certainly has earned its place in those luxurious, head-turning, exotic wood stocks; moreover, the 6.5 is becoming somewhat mainstream with increasing availability. Even the Weatherby Mark V is now available in 6.5-.300, a newly unveiled caliber actually birthed by Roy Weatherby himself in the early 1950s — another story in itself.

6.5 Creedmoor On The Hunt:
Either way, the 6.5 fire has surely ignited in the hunting world.
While the cartridge is quite an amazing caliber choice for deer, antelope, hogs and other mid-sized animals, its dominant performance in predator hunting is also a big factor — especially at long range.

Moreover, many agree the 6.5 Creedmoor is a formidable cartridge, even for big game such as elk. In fact, many suggest — and ballistics support — the 6.5 Creedmoor’s terminal performance as it relates to any North American game animal. Considering the dream combination the 6.5 CM presents, including higher velocity and energy at extended ranges, greater sectional density (.287) for deeper penetration, better BC for improved trajectory and even reduced recoil, it’s no wonder hunters are following suit with precision shooters and jumping aboard the 6.5 Creedmoor train.

Whether your clients are competitive precision shooters, hardcore hunters or both, the 6.5mm Creedmoor is worth their attention. If they’re not shooting this amazing cartridge now, they will be.
DosEquisShooter

eford

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2017, 04:02:05 AM »
.257: My 6.5 Creedmoor is a 1924 Mexican Mauser (Model 98) with an 24" ER Shaw barrel and a Boyds laminate stock. The barrel thing is a de-resonator, also called a donut, which might help with accuracy. After the initial load tests, the shot group was much wider than I expected. I lightened the trigger, put the donut on because I didn't think it could hurt anything, and the next groups were about half in inch @ 100 yards. I haven't taken it off since. I have one on a thin-barreled 243 WSSM that seems to improve accuracy.

According to Limbsaver, this is what the donut does.
The De-Resonator, a unique design with NAVCOM, is a major breakthrough in controlling the vibrations and barrel jump in rifles that cause discomfort and inaccuracy. This easy-to-install unit slips over the barrel, where it counteracts the harmonic resonance (vibrations) from the instant the bullet is fired, as it travels through the barrel and through its exit. By reducing the vibrations of the shot, even as the bullet travels through the barrel, it increases the accuracy of every shot, additionally, the De-Resonator also aids in target acquisition due to its ability to decrease barrel jump/walk at the shot
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 05:36:18 AM by eford »
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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2017, 05:20:34 AM »
Eford, thanks for the reply. I have never seen or heard of the barrel de-resonator
But than l think l live under a bigger rock than most. Heck l was 58 when l bought my first weatherby  ::)
Mike

zonie

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2017, 08:25:07 AM »
I have to differ a little bit long range elk hunting,  it's catching favor in AZ and other western states.  Long range hunting in general has been taking off for quite awhile for AZ Coues deer hunting (tiny deer)  shooting at extreme ranges across canyons and from one mtn to another.  The TV shows are definitely pushing the long range hunting and TV's far more exposure. We have been shooting longer ranges that pre-dates these shows you just don't hear about it.   I shoot longer ranges as does almost all my friends that hunt Coues deer in fact a couple of our friends have taken Coues at 1200 to 1400 yds using 6.5 - 06 Ackley Improved,  they do use ballistic programs on their phones and they do practice.   In fact  and I'm guessing his age around 80 year's old one local gun smith that makes some of these 6.5x06's can shoot  under 10 inches @ ranges of 1100 yds and these are not super fancy rifles mostly rem 700 actions with good barrels. Most of our friends use 7mm rem mags, 300 mags, even 30-378's, a few odd balls 300 panther's, the Ackleys and others,  this has been going on for years.  You would think whow a 30-378 for a deer that's about the size of a big german shepard is a little over kill,  it is,  but that's not why guy's use them it's because of the  hit factor increases,  Long range Coues hunting   is almost always a hunting with multiple people guy's and girls or in pairs one spotting and one shooting to be successful or rather being able to walk to a small critter in heavy brush 500 yds plus and being able to find it without help guiding you to the animal.    Hunting elk at long ranges is becoming more and more popular for the every day Joe, whether it's right or not is up to that person,  in fact I was just talking to a couple of guy's from a southern state that were hunting western New Mexico in a primo unit and they  took several very nice bulls in their hunting party that came in from at ranges around the 700 yd mark.  Custom guns and guy's that can shoot.  Is it doable you better believe it and it's growing.   My wife shoots 5" groups at 600 yds and I haven't really trained her that much.  One of my close G & F friends hunts elk in his favorite canyon where shots are way out there 700 - 800 yds or more.  He is now using  LLamas to get them out.  He uses a  stock 7mm  Rem mag,  Rem 700 with a 4.5 x 14  Leupold with a CDS dial and myself having shot it ,  it's accurate enough.  This guy does not shoot every day or even every month, but he's a good shot with a good rifle.  I don't like hunting at these really long ranges other than Coues deer, but I'm fully capable of wacking an elk at 1000 yds if I ever decided to.   Hell we were shooting 1000 yds targets with M1 Garands with iron sights of course the targets if memory serves me were about 6 ft by 6 ft .  I'm still surprised how accurate these old war horses are with good ammo.                                                                       
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 09:24:19 AM by zonie »

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2017, 02:11:22 PM »
The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed to be a very accurate, extremely long range.... target round.  As a hunting cartridge, it is in the 7mm-08/.260 Remington category.  Most of us would not use either of those for really long range elk hunting.  They do not have for the most part, the oomph necessary to put down a really large game animal at long distance.  I myself would not try it.  I would go with my .300 Weatherby/Winchester, .338 Win.mag., or my .375 Weatherby.  And even then, I would do a LOT of practice shooting at long distance, to make sure I was on target.  Past 500 yards, even with those big cases, you are starting to "lob" the projectiles.  MM

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2017, 04:03:04 PM »
Bad & eford, beautiful rifles!  Thanks for the gun porn.  ;D ;D ;D