Spike Camp

6.5 creedmoor

eford

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #30 on: November 27, 2017, 05:18:09 AM »
.....I myself would not try it.  I would go with my .300 Weatherby/Winchester, .338 Win.mag., or my .375 Weatherby.  And even then, I would do a LOT of practice shooting at long distance, to make sure I was on target.  Past 500 yards, even with those big cases, you are starting to "lob" the projectiles.  MM

The hunting shows advertising how well a certain outfitter takes care of your every need and guides you to within 600ish yards of an animal are BS to me. I could care less how well someone can be fed when they're hunting and the programs don't emphasize the skills of a hunter----such as get close. When that can't happen, I don't like the fact the same programs make it look like a +300 yard shot is easy. It is not easy. It takes a lot of practice, even when you think you know what you're doing the "buck fever" is hard to overcome. The long shots really do fall as if they were lobbed in from the other side of the county.
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dubyam

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #31 on: November 27, 2017, 05:28:17 AM »
You're right, eford, on shooting at distances out beyond 100-200yds. Most hunters and shooters (probaby >98%) don't practice beyond 200yds with any regularity, if at all. Practice from field positions (shooting sticks, prone from a backpack as a rest, kneeling and braced across your knee, etc.) Is a requirement for being good at these shots afield.
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zonie

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2017, 09:45:28 AM »
I've had the long range hunting discussion with friends and acquaintances for quite a few years,  originally I was against it but have now softened my stance as the years go by.  The logic being and I've seen this many times out hunting where un-trained,  buck fevered,  hunters just sling lead at pretty close ranges under 100 yds and still miss or wound the animal.   A friend made me re-think about how he was long range elk hunting,  basically he said you have slob hunters everywhere you go whether it's a guy slinging lead at close in deer, or a guy that misses the shot at long range and archery is even worst.  There is a certain amount of wounded animals no matter how careful we as hunters as a whole see every year.  I don't like it , but that's the facts and you are not going to change it,  unless you set, and test  each hunters  marksman ship skills pass or fail  in the whole country reducing probably by a lot the amount of wounded animals.   Getting a guide license in some countries you got to shoot and pass to get your license.  These little hunter education courses given out by the states are fine , but not exactly comprehensive where shooting skills under different circumstances are mandated.  When I was 10 years old in an old Army  Cavalry barn on Fort Apache Az we were taught to shoot NRA courses and must pass to be able to quality for hunting big game at this young age,   later in life the state went to it's own hunter education courses which I went thru anyway just for fun. Us old timers came from a hunting society where in my case  took our guns out behind the Jail which was behind our house and blazed away with our 22's, when we ran out of ammo we went to the little gas station cady corner from our house and bought more ammo,  no one thought anything of it.  I guarantee if you seen this jail back before it was torn down there is no way you would want to be held in this hoos gow , 2 ft  concrete walls, open bay, one wood stove, and thick flat iron slats where the windows would be just about  like the old Yuma territorial prison was built.    My point is we don't have the firearms training as a whole for young kids anymore it's tabo in circles.  Anyway I'm convinced today especially with today's way better optics, accuracy enhanced rifles,  ballistic programs ,  better ballistic bullets and ammo and with the right training and practice almost anyone can be trained to shoot much long ranges if they were to take an interest in it.  I always figured a persons max big game  range is a 9 " paper plate if you start missing that 9" plate in whatever shooting position you may shoot from  you better get closer,  bearing in mind you are using a powerful enough gun to get the job done with energy to spare.  I taught my kids with 9" balloons  on strings staked at different ranges in the ground , instant gratification when they hit them, and they move in the wind,  great practice, most everyone can do it at shorter ranges from a bench, but standing, prone, kneeling and sitting it can become quite humbling, but it trains you to shoot or not, making you think about the shot,  and get closer.  There are people that are really really good at shooting long ranges I probably see them more up here because of what we do and sometimes the very open country where you are not going to get any closer to that elk with out him seeing you.  Some guy's will say walk away for another day that's ok for me we live and hunt here,  but other guy's sling lead, take chances, or they learn to shoot long ranges.  100-200 yds on deer if they are still I'll shoot off hand if I don't have a rest,  elk are huge by comparison 300-400 yds I can do off hand if they are broadside not moving,  and I haven't been drinking a lot of coffee,  I much prefer taking a rest of some type  but there are times rests are not an option,  people will say that's not right well that's ok no one is asking them to do what we do.  Coues deer hunting can be as easy as driving down the road or more than likely getting close is not happening, they will sit there and let you walk right by if you don't see them which usually takes hours behind the bino's and spotters.  I get a kick out of watching these little deer hunkered down in the brush and some hunters decides to walk this super thick vegetation and see if they can kick out a nice coues buck not knowing where they are, about the time the hunter passes the bedded down little deer the buck decides it's safe and get's up and sneaks away.  On average from where we hunt you are looking at a min of 350 yds to  much farther and how far are you comfortable shooting, best to be geared up for 500 to 800 yds,   and there ain't no frekin way the majority of even good hunters are going to sneak up on them,  more than likely in these brushy mtns you can't even walk thru you might kick out a rattle snake or sit on one, maybe spook a mtn lion,   they don't call them the grey ghost for nothing.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 04:07:30 PM by zonie »

danno50

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2017, 12:35:10 PM »
You're right, eford, on shooting at distances out beyond 100-200yds. Most hunters and shooters (probaby >98%) don't practice beyond 200yds with any regularity, if at all. Practice from field positions (shooting sticks, prone from a backpack as a rest, kneeling and braced across your knee, etc.) Is a requirement for being good at these shots afield.
I'll echo the same thoughts. Especially with all the hype about long range rifles, superior ammo, wind, elevation, drop compensation laser scopes that are all the rage. The average and below average shooters/hunters are tempted more and more to take shots only their equipment is capable of handling. Long as they can hit moa at 1 and 200 yards from the bench, they'll let their equipment and ballistics charts extrapolate everything past 200 yards. I'm sure there are some legitimate competitive long range shooters/hunters on our forum, but they probably fall into the 2% category that have practiced for years. Kudos to them. Wounding a game animal should weigh heavy on the minds of all good hunters at any considered distance. 
DosEquisShooter

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #34 on: November 27, 2017, 03:04:38 PM »
The flight time of the bullet alone gives the critter a second or more to move unless you have it super glued to a spot at 1000 yds.  :) Yea, I know a few of us are world record breaking marksman! Buck fever at 500 yds.? Try being eyeball to eyeball at 20 yds.!
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 03:08:36 PM by badsection »

zonie

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2017, 05:00:02 PM »
We have been close many many times almost trampled by an elk herd one year when my son was 11 years old, on his first hunt at Sipe wildlife area in an old hay field we sneaked in before daylight using a very small creek bank then I saw the image of a cow elk above us and told my son as soon as it get's light we are going to climb up the little rise and see if you can get a shot,  little did I know there were other hunters on the other side of the field and when we crested the slight elevation the field was on,  shots rang out not from us,  the elk saw us and didn't know what to do and then ran in circles around us,  the ground shook, I'll bet there were 200 or so elk in that field , bulls , cows, calfs it was an interesting morning.   I literally drove my buddy in the middle of a small elk herd kind of by accident  in New Mexico on a muzzle loader hunt and of course one shot he missed the whole 25 animals , couldn't believe it.   Been chased and mock charged by black bear,  cornered a mtn lion  by mistake in an abandoned cowboy line shack he could have swatted me so fast you couldn't believe,  the hair on the back of my neck was standing and didn't have a gun on me I left it in the truck, my buddy said get the gun from the truck and go get him,   I told him you want him you go in there,  we tossed rocks at him and finally gave up to go scout for elk. That was one pissed off kitty.  Called in mtn Lions and bears with an old wooden  lohman mouth call.  While turkey calling a pack of wolves howling back they saw us.  While elk hunting one wolf eyeballing my wifes elk in the back of the truck she shot earlier in the evening and that wolf howled all night in camp keeping my wife up which in turn kept me up.  I've had vermin try to get in my lap when varmit calling,  Turkey calling we sometimes get deer and elk to come rather close to see what all that racket is,  you can smell an elk before they get on you.  More than once I've had bear following me,  finding steaming bear crap in my foot steps on the way back out.  Had my neighbors  leather jacket ripped up  on his body from a mtn lion because he got too close with the dogs. They don't like shooting female mtn lions bad for business.  Had a frekin 2000 pound male buffalo with his cows  tear down a fence to get to me because I got stupid with him.  That one kind of scared me.  3 times in one year the family had bear encounters once with my wife , daughter and I out elk hunting,  once when my daughter, friend and I were out scouting for elk  a bear  in the bottom of the little canyon chased my daughter up a little hill to where we were,  and once when my son while archery turkey hunting thought he heard a  bull elk tearing up a tree and found out it was an angry 400 pound male black bear that didn't give his ground and came after him and then stopped, my son had one arrow left,  he now carries a hot loaded 45 acp  or long colt in the field even when bow hunting. Had one of the neighbors horses out in her field along with ours and bull elk stuck her mare in the neck with his antler had to call the vet and stich her up.   You are right eyeball to eyeball can get at little interesting.     
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 05:38:35 PM by zonie »

224KING

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2017, 07:35:01 PM »
Your gonna have to get a publicist if you keep making posts that long.
Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

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zonie

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #37 on: November 28, 2017, 07:30:52 PM »
Yea I know long posts.   

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #38 on: December 03, 2017, 04:34:05 AM »
I own 3 6.5 Creeds. One in a Vanguard, one HOWA heavy barrel, and a M70 with a Krieger barrel. The 6.5 Creed was originally designed as a LR competition round and not as a hunting round. That came later. High BC bullets are the key. I have killed whitetails with all three of these rifles out to several hundred yards but I find the 6.5 CM more fun to plink steel at 1,000 yards than as a hunting round. It's fairly inexpensive to load, low recoil, and is extremely accurate. I do a lot of target shooting (hunting season is relatively short and a dozen or so rounds of just about any caliber is all I need to fill the freezer) so it fills a nice niche for me. I actually looked at the 6.5-300 for a short period of time but luckily my brain kicked back in and I came to my senses. I understand that it is a fabulous hunting round, but I just couldn't justify the cost of handloading it. Besides, I doubt the barrel would stand up to our local neighborhood FU class (don't ask ;D) competition shooting (lots of rounds downrange in a relatively short time) but the 6.5 CM does fine. I don't own a 243/6mm at the present time but if I decide to go that route I will probably go with the 6 mm Creedmoor. Off the shelf twist rates are great for heavier bullets, something that your standard .243 cannot deal with. The 6 CM is already beating the 6.5 CM in some competitions.

So, if you want a tack driver that is easy and relatively cheap to load for and is really fun to shoot I would recommend the 6.5 CM. It will do in a pinch on deer too, but for deer hunting I generally pick up my .257 Bee.  8)

224KING

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #39 on: December 03, 2017, 05:43:54 AM »
I own 3 6.5 Creeds. One in a Vanguard, one HOWA heavy barrel, and a M70 with a Krieger barrel. The 6.5 Creed was originally designed as a LR competition round and not as a hunting round. That came later.



Yea,about 15 minutes later.

You know when car racing started?When the second one was built.LOL
Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

Everyone has a photographic memory.Some just don't have film.

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #40 on: December 03, 2017, 06:17:14 AM »
Rate the 3 you have for accuracy Downeast.
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2017, 06:49:04 PM »
Often wondered about the Creedmoor but I have a Swede it is getting sent to Corlanes in Dawson Creek BC to get an extra 2 inches put on the barrel so I can benefit for the case over the 260. Have a friend in the foothills that shoots wolves with his Creedmoor with good success in the spring when his cow are calving. I was going to buy a Creedmoor but cost of ammo was about $5 A box more than the Swede, now that I handload again I can shoot either and it will be just as cheap the 129 hornady interlock leaves a hole the size of a golf ball both sides in a whitetail.

.257

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2017, 04:23:00 AM »
Often wondered about the Creedmoor but I have a Swede it is getting sent to Corlanes in Dawson Creek BC to get an extra 2 inches put on the barrel so I can benefit for the case over the 260. Have a friend in the foothills that shoots wolves with his Creedmoor with good success in the spring when his cow are calving. I was going to buy a Creedmoor but cost of ammo was about $5 A box more than the Swede, now that I handload again I can shoot either and it will be just as cheap the 129 hornady interlock leaves a hole the size of a golf ball both sides in a whitetail.

Depending on what action your Swede is built on, if its an older action the PSI needs to stay in the 45,000- 46,000 range where as the Creedmore with modern actions are being loaded to PSI in the 59,000 range
If you have a modern action, than you can research and find some of the loads for the modern actions, with PSI in the 57,000 range. But use caution and make sure your action can handle the higher PSI

Either way an animal will never know the difference from a Swede and a Creedmore
Mike

Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2017, 05:42:17 PM »
Sako model 75 is the rifle. I also have a T3 lite in the same , but was going to leave the Sako as is the T3 will be the one getting the build done . I am loading both of these to around 61000 with no problems so for both are modern actions Sako tests both the tikka and Sako with proof load of 72000 if they don't handle that they don't leave Finland.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2017, 06:22:02 PM by northern hunter »

.257

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Re: 6.5 creedmoor
« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2017, 07:03:58 PM »
Either of those action can be loaded to higher PSI than most manuals. Do some research online and you will find lots of loads that will be faster than the 6.5 creedmore or the 260 rem. The long range guys have started loading it so there is a good place to start your search for loads

Just use caution
Mike