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Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.

Hello,

I did a search on shoulder bump or bumping the shoulder and I found a number of post. I am having trouble viewing what has already been posted. When I click on an topic or reply that I found from my search, I am unable to go to that particular post. I hate to cover the same ground that has probably been traveled a bunch of times.
I'm looking at reloading my .257 Weatherby and setting my dies correctly. Also I would like to know if the Hornady headspace comparator set is any value in measuring the shoulder set back. Thank you.

Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2017, 11:42:37 AM »
I use the Hornady comparator to set up my dies for shoulder bump. I believe with my 257 Wm I used the D cylinder. Just screw your die down in your press till it touches the shell holder. Then unscrew it a couple of turns and take a measurement of your fired case with the Hornady tool. Begin resizing your case and taking measurements after each sizing. Turn your die in 1/2 turn each time and stop when your desired shoulder bump has been reached. I believe .002-.003 is good as this gives good easy chambering and doesn't stress your brass much
 When you take your initial measurement of your fired brass, you should do so with the primer removed as sometimes you can get a false reading with it in the case. Cratering or slightly protruded etc will give an incorrect reading.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:47:41 AM by canadian reloarder »

Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2017, 01:55:01 PM »
Agree with previous post. I just did my 270wby cases this morning. The only thing I do different is I use shims under my size die locknut i stead of trying to make micro adjustments on my die. Example: If I size my case and it sets the shoulder back .007", I just add a .005" shim under the locknut and it should come out pretty close to setting it back .002"(always remeasure). When I want to neck size without touching the shoulder I put .020" stack of shims under locknut. I dont ever move the locknut (just keep notes of what shims I use for the task). It takes me awhile to get it set the first time, but is a breeze everytime after. Always use the same shellholder as well.

Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2017, 08:41:13 PM »
Using shims is even a better way of doing this. It gives you some play when your brass gets a little older. And as JayW posted by all means use the same shellholder. Not the same make and # but the SAME shellholder. I once ruined 50 cases of 300 Win mag by changing shellholders.

ctw

Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2017, 06:48:46 AM »
   A more fool proof method is to use the redding competition shellholder set. Comes with 5 piece set in .002 thous. increments; starting with the .010 thous. one you work your way down until your case chambers with out resistance; you have now achieved your preferred shoulder bump. Midway USA sells these. Go to the redding sight and check it out. ctw     

Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2017, 06:41:33 AM »
How i do that is pretty low tech and a little bit barbairic. With the ram at the top screw.the die all the way then back it out so you can slide a nickle snugly under it.

dubyam

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Re: Hello. Trying to find information on bumping the shoulder back.
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2017, 07:22:10 AM »
I've had good results using the method Canadian Reloarder outlined in his first post. I also use the "D" heads pace bushing to measure shoulder length on Weatherbys.

What I've found works well for me is to neck size a few times and then bump the shoulder. My cases don't get tight until 3-4 firings, so neck sizing saves me time and working of my brass.
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