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Hunting Clothes Then and Now

Michiganhunter

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Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« on: March 11, 2018, 09:13:40 AM »
Iím sure a great deal of the older members of this great Weatherby Nation have experienced the change of clothes in the last 60 years.
We now have some of the lightest, warmest, weather proof gear to wear that our grandparents could only have dreamed of.
Some of the old gear is still the best. Most are not.
As a kid on a farm in Michigan, with limited money, winters were especially a challenge. Boots were a major issue if you worked in the woods, cutting cedar for fence posts or cedar boughs to sell for wreaths or grave blankets. Ice fishing or waiting for our beagle to push the snowshoe rabbits to us.
I would read about Mukluks and Canadian Sorel boots but the cost was too much. We would buy those black rubber boots with the buckles a couple sizes bigger and would wrap layers of newspapers around our feet for insulation. I wore hand knitted wool socks and one piece wool long johns with the trapdoor in the back. I was never bothered with the itching that my brothers couldnít stand. I was lucky.i also had wool bibs and coats that kept me warm when it was wet.
I still use wool garments in the winter. They are as great now as they were hundreds of years ago.
Now we have base layers that move sweat from your skin, mid layers of fleece, down vests both natural and synthetic and top layers of waterproof rain gear.
I often think about our ancestors who did not have these luxuries and wonder if I would have survived back then. They were some tough people who braved the elements and not only survived but actually thrived.
The good ole days werenít so good as they sounded. We are really fortunate.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 09:23:21 AM by Michiganhunter »
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PARA45

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Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2018, 10:53:39 AM »
I've always said that those hunters back in the 1800s, to early 1900s were a bunch of tough SOBs.  Specially those who ventured into Alaska in search of Gold.

The new stuff in today's clothing is Merino wool.  That stuff is great, it doesn't itch, or smell after days of intense use, and it dries quickly.  This stuff helps you regulate your own body heat.  There are also some synthetic stuff that is great as well.  I have stuff from First Lite, KUIU & Badlands.  Awesome stuff.   

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2018, 11:55:40 AM »
Can you imagine the weight of some of those clothes when they got wet?

I don't wear much of the light weight stuff as I work around barbed wire and other sharp stuff so seem to stick to Carhart type gear.
I can't tame wild women
But I can make tame women wild

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2018, 01:11:54 PM »
I have some of the Sitka, Kuiu, Kings, etc... My opinion is this, yes...the new clothing is nice, but not really necessary for 90% of hunting situations. Yes...if you are hunting out of a backpack/1 horse, chasing sheep, or hunting in parts of Alaska...then sure.

If you have "traditional" camouflage clothing and a set of raingear, you're fine for the majority of hunting situations. I see people spending thousands of dollars on clothing that isn't really necessary for the hunting they're doing. It is kind of crazy...
JK

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2018, 01:42:07 PM »
As kids, we wore those buckle up rubber boots, too. My dad would take us ( I had 6 brothers, no sisters) to the surplus store and buy us pea coats and such for the winter when we lived near Chicago.  Since I had 4 older brothers, everything was hand me downs till I had a job to buy my own.  Working outside all my life, my work clothes doubled as hunting clothes. Nasty cold had me wearing insulated coveralls.  LOL, now it's bug proof and snake proof clothes   ;D

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2018, 03:11:11 PM »
82 degrees here today and I still have my Carhart insulated coveralls and a goose down parka I have never worn from a sale at L L Bean in Freeport, ME.  Bought the parka at half price in the early 90's. I did use the coveralls once here in Florida when I did a wiring job in a walk in freezer.

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2018, 01:41:40 PM »
I'm one of the old school guys who still wear the insulated red and black plaid Woolrich coat, woolen shirts, and pants well that was until my wife's cooking caught up with my waist.  Now I wear a pair of Carhartt insulated pants.  I absolutely love those Woolrich outfits, they keep you warm no matter how cold it gets unfortunately the damn bean counters at Woolrich put the end to them making them anymore.   >:(  They make woolen shirts but they're not as heavy as the old ones were, if I remember right those shirts were the model 53.  The coats were model 523, and the pants were model number 1964 or 1967.  Now they make the Classic Hunting coat which isn't insulated, which really makes me wonder what the heck they're thinking with that idea.  I even called them and the lady told me that they get hundreds of calls every year from people asking them to make them again and the damn bean counters won't give in to letting them make them again.  If they made them again I'd buy them again in a heartbeat.  The only down fall to them is they got heavy if they got soaked but even then they keep you nice and warm.  For boots I wore the five buckle arctics, the black pull over boots that you wear on top of your shoes.  Then as I got older my Mom and Dad bought me Sorels.  About tn years ago I bought a pair of Schnee's Arctic boots and my feet are always warm.  Yeah the Schnee's are expensive but they're rebuildable, which I did and ended up saving a lot of money doing that opposed to buying a new pair.  Honestly I miss those days and the new gear is nice but I don't need it and really don't like the prices of the stuff. 
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 02:21:39 PM »
My dad was a Woolrich fan for years. One year, he gave all 7 of his sons a really nice insulated Woolrich shirt/jack. I wore mine out after many years.  I got into Pendelton wool shirts, still have a couple. Years ago, I drove up to my son's in Virginia in the middle of a blizzard. His GSD bit me in the forearm and drew some serious blood, but most of all, the damn dog ruined my  $100+ Pendleton shirt!  I would work outside with a L L Bean river driver's shirt and a Pendleton wool shirt most of the winter, as long as I was moving. The serious winter gear would come out when I was stuck in one spot for a few hours, like a cut telco cable. My long time night shift partner said I had the constitution of a polar bear.  ;D

eford

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Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2018, 04:32:50 PM »
Michiganhunter: your tactics to keep warm back then are very familiar. I especially liked the heavy lined mittens but also valued long john underware and two pairs of jeans to stop the wind. Merino wool today and Thinsulate, plus good old cotton lined jackets can do a lot.
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Michiganhunter

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Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 06:32:38 PM »
I still use wool all winter. I have purchased Filson, Pendleton and Woolrich for years. They truly are great products and worth the cost. They last for years. I have coats I purchased 40 years ago that I continue to wear. I bought them a size or two bigger than I needed so I could layer underneath with wool jackshirts and sweaters. The only thing that has caused me to buy more pants, shirts, vests and sweaters has been the steady increase in my butt and belly. I just bought a new Filson red/black check double mackinaw with a shearling collar today. It was a present from my wife for 42 years of me being meek, submissive and never arguing with her because sheís always right. I have a book coming out about marriage ď How to be a spineless, cowardly husband and being okay with itĒ. You can pre-order it at Imawimp.com.
I have passed down my wool clothing to my nephews and kids I know who hunt and fish.
When I hunt the mountains out west in the months of September, October and November I use wool or polypropylene base layers, cotton/polyester hunting pants, wool, fleece or cotton/poly shirts. In my day pack I carry a down jacket and gore-Tex rain/windproof over pants and hooded jacket. I always carry an extra pair of socks, wool hat and spare pair of waterproof insulated gloves. Also included is a half dozen chemical hand and toe warmers.
This setup allows me to hunt from leaving camp in the morning when it is 0 degrees to 80 degrees mid-day, where I have literally hunted in just my longjohns, from the desert to above the tree line and then layer back up towards the end of the day.
In the below zero temps in northern Michigan from November to March, whether hunting bunnies in the cedar swamps or predators at the edge of open, windy fields to ice fishing on the windswept Great Lakes, I wear wool clothes and waterproof bibs and a parka with Sorel/LL Bean felt and wool rubber bottoms/leather uppers boots. In my day pack I carry a spare pair of liners, socks and gloves. I also have those military ECWS big gauntlet style waterproof mittens with the fake fur tops replaced with real tanned beaver, otter or muskrat fur my wife sews on and inside the big mittens I wear wool fingerless gloves/mittens with chemical hand warmers. I actually buy the toe warmers, with a peel and sticky back, half moon shape warmers because they fit perfectly inside wool glo-mits. When Iím ice fishing or predator hunting I have those tube shaped hand warmers with a couple chemical/air activated warmers. I also wear the bomber style real fur hat with the ear flaps with a thin beanie hat underneath. Now that Iím getting older, if itís really, really cold, I stay home and nap in front of a wood stove.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 03:27:47 AM by Michiganhunter »
If you are arguing with an idiot and someone passes by, they don't know who's the idiot.

Re: Hunting Clothes Then and Now
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2018, 08:28:32 PM »
they also used natural dyes, vs all this UV dyes we have today.

and it's come full circle with wool once again being praised.

sure there are some advances, but I don't think we've come that far with that much...