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Weatherby Calibers

danno50

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Weatherby Calibers
« on: April 11, 2018, 06:05:30 PM »
Its been approx. 73 years since Roy Weatherby designed the first of his great calibers. It took all of the money he could scrape together, a lot of outside the box thinking, and countless hours were invested to try and prove his theory that velocity conveyed hydrostatic shock. All with the basic tooling of the day. If he had been content to be a rifle maker and never invented these calibers, how long do you suppose before someone else would have developed them? Was his case, bolt, and rifle design radical enough that it would have been 10, 20, or more years (from 1945) before these calibers may have been developed? Just hypothetical. Anyone's thoughts?                                               
 
DosEquisShooter

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Re: Weatherby Calibers
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2018, 08:18:21 PM »
I think that the fast throw bolt would have come along sometime.It's amazing to me that someone like Remington never necked down the 7mag to 270 cal though and made it a standard cartridge.Winchester was pretty innovative to do the 264 Win Mag.You would think that they would have necked it down to 25,but the 264 was known as a "Barrel burner" so going to 25 with it would have been a real dud in their mind.You just never know.Sometimes coming out with a new cal;iber is just good or bad timing.
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danno50

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Re: Weatherby Calibers
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2018, 06:35:42 AM »
I think that back then, rifle and bullet mfg's were content to try and mass produce(as much as they could with the machinery they had)rifles and bullets to keep themselves in a thriving( to some extent) business, and keep up with the demand of the shooting sportsmen. Research and development was done to some degree, but maybe the wildcatters of the day were hobbled by the lack of money for tooling and R&D departments had a limited number of "real engineers" working on new designs? 
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