Spike Camp

Shooting Sticks or Bipod

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2018, 08:55:59 AM »
Looking for suggestions for 200-400 yard  shooting when hiking and stalking Elk with my 06. Thanks all.
I vote for sticks over bipods although I do have both. Bipods work well but only if you have time to setup and use a good one like the Atlas. I don't like the added weight but on a short hunt it's not bad.
What doesn't kill you will make you stronger, except bears. Bears will kill you...

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2018, 05:02:22 PM »
On a recent pronghorn hunt, I opted to take both a Harris bi-pod and a sitting/kneeling tripod.  Shooting sticks secures you on only one axis.  I much prefer the tripod because you can really lean into it to be secure on two axis.  FWIW

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2018, 09:57:27 AM »
I'm inclined to agree with the guys about carrying extra crap around all day. One thing a lot of people overlook is the value of a sling used properly (around the supporting arm) to steady the rifle substantially over casual offhand. Any of ya'll who served in the Marine Corps were most likely trained in this practice. I do it and it helps a lot.
Some like cologne, I like the smell of gunpowder.

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2018, 12:40:47 PM »
I have and regularly practice with 3 leg shooting sticks, 3 leg trigger sticks and an attached Harris bipod.  The bipod from prone is hands down the most solid.

In Africa I always opt for 3 leg shooting sticks over the 2 leg variety, and I have asked my PH to make 3 leg sticks for me if he only has the 2 leg variety.  The problem I have with any of the sticks is my unsupported right elbow.  I gave up a shot at a HUGE Roosevelt Sable in Mozambique one year because I couldn't hold steady enough for the shot.  It also didn't help that when we first saw that bull, my PH said "That's a MONSTER!"

On my last eastern Montana Pronghorn antelope hunt, I had my Trigger sticks with me, but when it came time for the shot, I just crawled into position and shot from prone with my sling.
NRA Endowment Life Member

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2018, 01:56:42 PM »
I have used a gun mounted bi-pod for many years ground hog hunting and wouldn't hunt without it, but I understand that tall grass can make it less effective.
I do use a Primos trigger stick in my tree stand, rest it against the shooting rail and you have a steady/adjustable rest for most shooting situations.


Terry
Ontario,Canada........yours to discover

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2018, 02:04:43 PM »
I certainly use bipods on several target guns. My hog hunting is mostly done out of tree stands and I might use a cloth towel to "insulate" my gun from a metal rail on the stand. I have tried a mono pod at the range, wasted money!  :)

Re: Shooting Sticks or Bipod
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2018, 08:30:23 AM »
I'm inclined to agree with the guys about carrying extra crap around all day. One thing a lot of people overlook is the value of a sling used properly (around the supporting arm) to steady the rifle substantially over casual offhand. Any of ya'll who served in the Marine Corps were most likely trained in this practice. I do it and it helps a lot.

Agree, that's the way I was taught when I was on my high school (military academy) shooting team. I did that during boot camp too and saved my company commander from an embarrassing loss to his buddy. If you know how to do it, you'll take that stiff but pretty sling and oil and work it over a 2x4 for hours to make is super soft and supple. Once done, a proper wrap over your hard can be achieved and you can make that rifle feel like it's glued to your body and can often see your heartbeat in the reticle. Webbed slings make it easy but they're ugly on a Weatherby.
What doesn't kill you will make you stronger, except bears. Bears will kill you...