Spike Camp

Meat freshness

Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2018, 12:27:34 PM »
Sorry you had to loose it. Next time you run into this situation just quarter it without gutting it and leave the rest behind to feed other critters.
Steve
Lifetime NRA Member
Retired in the Nevada high desert and loving life.

danno50

  • *****
  • 2916
    • View Profile
Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2018, 12:30:11 PM »
Wise choice Mark V Hunter. Much as I place venison at the top of the list for Comfort food, green meat around the ribs is more than a risky proposition, its a certain trip to the ER. To make a good faith effort to find the deer is the essential key.
DosEquisShooter

Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2018, 02:35:35 PM »
I remember a deer killed on my dad's farm on the eastern shore of MD. by a rifle shot that had a really bad infection from a arrow wound. It became crab pot bait.  If you even question the chance of it being bad, throw it out!!!!!   Finding it showed class, choosing not to eat it showed good sense.  ;D

zonie

  • *****
  • 6842
    • View Profile
Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2018, 04:32:50 PM »
I'll give you a little story, we had a cow elk go bad in about 2 hours, we were hunting the Rim area S/E  of Flagstaff.  On our way back home we had everything packed up and driving out from camp and saw a nice little herd of elk one of the guy's didn't have his elk yet so we stopped and he shot one. There was snow on the ground later in the day so the guy's field dressed it and threw it in the back of a Jeepster Commando my West Yellowstone friend owned,  I was towing the Jeep with my old Ford f-250 with cab over camper,  which had  other elk stuffed in the camper.  Anyway about an hour out of Flag we lost a rear wheel on the Jeepster Commando because my friend decided to put new bearings in the rear end the week before and didn't get them in right. (That's another story in itself) anyway we had covered the elk with a small canvas tarp in the ass end of the open Commando ( that we should have never done ) it was frekin cold out to begin with so there was no need for a tarp.   The heat generated from the axle and bearing conducted and radiated into the tarped  bed of the Jeepster and COOKED the elk and we didn't know it until the rear tire and wheel passed us on the freeway and found the superheated glowing red  remains of the axle about 500 ft back on the I-40.  We lost most of the elk and that was in freezing cold weather.    Things happen and won't do again,  don't tarp an elk when it's not needed and don't work on your darn vehicle a week before you travel with it.  I probably have a dozen stories about that POS Jeepster, we sank it in a creek miles from nowhere near Nogales,  it ran backwards down a mtn in reverse because it lost all foreward gears,  the horn froze and sounded loud and clear and couldn't get it shut off until the wires were yanked, we were  in a canyon and elk scattered everywhere and none of us had a gun ready.  That actually happened to my old jeep also steering wheel was cracked and in freezing weather it shrunk and the horn button dropped in the steering wheel and made contact, and the list goes on.  Moral to the story if you go where we go have a good vehicle or two in case you break down because there ain't no cell phone coverage.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2018, 09:06:17 PM by zonie »

DW5

  • *****
  • 1608
    • View Profile
Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2018, 07:15:29 PM »
I'll give you a little story, we had a cow elk go bad in about 2 hours, we were hunting the Rim area S/E  of Flagstaff.  On our way back home we had everything packed up and driving out from camp and saw a nice little herd of elk one of the guy's didn't have his elk yet so we stopped and he shot one. There was snow on the ground later in the day so the guy's field dressed it and threw it in the back of a Jeepster Commando my West Yellowstone friend owned,  I was towing the Jeep with my old Ford f-250 with cab over camper,  which had  other elk stuffed in the camper.  Anyway about an hour out of Flag we lost a rear wheel on the Jeepster Commando because my friend decided to put new bearings in the rear end the week before and didn't get them in right. (That's another story in itself) anyway we had covered the elk with a small canvas tarp in the ass end of the open Commando ( that we should have never done ) it was frekin cold out to begin with so there was no need for a tarp.   The heat generated from the axle and bearing conducted and radiated into the tarped  bed of the Jeepster and COOKED the elk and we didn't know it until the rear tire and wheel passed us on the freeway and found the superheated glowing red  remains of the axle about 500 ft back on the I-40.  We lost most of the elk and that was in freezing cold weather.    Things happen and won't do again,  don't tarp an elk when it's not needed and don't work on your darn vehicle a week before you travel with it.  I probably have a dozen stories about that POS Jeepster, we sank it in a creek miles from nowhere near Nogales,  it ran backwards down a mtn in reverse because it lost all foreward gears,  the horn froze and sounded loud and clear and couldn't get it shut off until the wires were yanked, we were  in a canyon and elk scattered everywhere and none of us a gun ready.  That actually happened to my old jeep also steering wheel was cracked and in freezing weather it shrunk and dropped in the steering wheel and made contact, and the list goes on.  Moral to the story if you go where we go have a good vehicle or two in case you break down because there ain't no cell phone coverage.

HA! Sounds like the moral of the story is that Jeep might have been vegan!
You cant catch a fish without a hook in the water....

zonie

  • *****
  • 6842
    • View Profile
Re: Meat freshness
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2018, 09:34:53 PM »
I think you might be right it was a vegan  ;D .  One thing it did do for us as bad as it was treated we were never left totally stranded , we always managed to limp back,  not like these new vehicles with all the electronics  you break one of them and unless you carry the correct spare parts it's done.   We may have had to crimp brake lines with a vice grip,  re-weld the front bumper on at a local service  station because that's where my friend decided to mount the tow bar, you ever seen the front bumper on a Jeepster Commander it's like chromed  tin and flexes just as much.  Another trip heading down south to the border towing his jeep again the tow bar was bent from a previous hunting trip where he forgot to pin the tow bar in the up and locked position and of course it flopped down and  drove over it  lifting the front end of the jeep off the ground twisting the tow bar,  then he didn't fix it and we hooked it on the back of my truck and got about 30 miles and the tow bar popped off and started dragging the jeep almost sideways going slow ,  thankfully heavy safety chains held and we didn't loose the jeep,  after that I made him get a new tow bar , a really heavy duty one that you can't break.  When he finally got rid of the Jeepster and bought a newer CJ-5,  I got the tow bar and put it on a fixer upper jeep I had bought.    We were up deer hunting near devil dog road west of Flagstaff I towed the jeepster again behind my old Ford & cab over  camper, but this time my wife drove her Nissan Sentra up because she couldn't stay the whole time with us,  it rained / snowed and got god awful muddy with that AZ red clay.  I got the Ford & camper out but the Nissan with stuck like a bug in a rug, the wheel wells totally filled up with clay and cinders,  luckily my buddies jeepster commander came to the rescue and in four wheel drive he pulled her to hard pack road,  he did break the drive shaft carrier bearing but at least we got it hooked back up with the tow bar.  When my wife got to pavement which is I-40 the wheels were so out of balance from all the mud she could only do maybe 20 miles an hours on the freeway so we pulled over and shoveled out as much mud as we could until we got to a gas station out back parking area and we pulled each wheel and shoveled and washed out as much mud as we could.  I think that car still had cinders in the framework when we sold it to my buddies son years later.   Good memories and that's what hunting is all about. 
« Last Edit: November 13, 2018, 09:52:20 PM by zonie »