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How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?

How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?
« on: December 26, 2018, 11:31:57 AM »
I bought a new .300 Mag Vanguard for about half price from my cousin who won it in a rafle.  When I received it the bolt was missing.  He cant find it and I never even saw it. When I went on line to look it up there are about a dozen versions.  I called Weatherby and the kid helping me said I would need to send it in.  They would fit a bolt to it and run it through a micrometer and safety inspection.  This would run about $500 not including the shipping to and from FFLs.  Replacing the bolt would cost more than buying a new one when all costs are totaled.  This is really turning me off to Weatherby.  Can anyone help me before I toss this in the garbage? 
I cant believe there isn't some way to identify the rifle and the correct fit for a bolt.
Please Help me.......

dubyam

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Re: How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2018, 01:15:22 PM »
The bolt has to be headspace to the barrel. Its not a size or series issue. It literally is a unique fitment. Now, $500 is asinine. The bolt should run you a couple hundred. Headspacing by a gunsmith should run you another $100-200.

A quick check shows a magnum bolt face bolt with ejector and extractor, firing pin, spring, and cocking piece all in stock at Numrich. Buy the parts and build a bolt, then take your rifle to a gunsmith for headspacing. Don't skip that last step. Seriously.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

.257

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Re: How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2018, 04:40:55 PM »
The bolt has to be headspace to the barrel. Its not a size or series issue. It literally is a unique fitment. Now, $500 is asinine. The bolt should run you a couple hundred. Headspacing by a gunsmith should run you another $100-200.

A quick check shows a magnum bolt face bolt with ejector and extractor, firing pin, spring, and cocking piece all in stock at Numrich. Buy the parts and build a bolt, then take your rifle to a gunsmith for headspacing. Don't skip that last step. Seriously.

Don't take this wrong but l disagree. $200 for a bolt, $100-200 for gunsmithing with a safety check, l will go with the $200 which adds up to $400. Now you are liable for this gun, insurance cost, easily $500.
I am not sure why they would do it for that

If your looking for help and advice, don't loose the bolt!!
Mike

dubyam

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Re: How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2018, 08:28:37 PM »
Since a gunsmith will install a barrel on an action for the $100-200 price range (with no other truing or additional work included) it's pretty straight forward they won't be concerned about the liability.

It's not cheap, for sure, either way.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie

dubyam

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Re: How can I identify which bolt my .300 Vanguard needs?
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2018, 08:34:45 PM »
As a less expensive alternative (from a reputable aftermarket manufacturer) you could buy this Weatherby replacement bolt from Pacific Tool and Gauge:

http://pacifictoolandgauge.com/howa-nosler-weatherby-bolts/14688-ptg-rh-la-weatherby-nosler-howa-replacement-bolt-assembly-magbf.html

Note that they specify, as did I, that the assembly needs to be headspaced by a competent gunsmith. Total out the door somewhere in the $300-ish range if you're lucky.
I believe this is a practical world, and in it I can count only on what I can earn.  Therefore I believe in work, hard work. - The Auburn Creed
The older I get, the less stock I place in what men say, and the more I place in what men do. - Andrew Carnegie