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Husqvarna rifles

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2019, 12:31:12 AM »
Before the flood I had an almost complete Gun Digest collection except for three of the first five editions.  As one poster mentioned about the old Shooter's Bibles, the information in those old Digests was amazing.  Husqvarna was ONE of the builders of the famous Swedish Mausers, that are known for their build quality and accuracy.  Those were Model 94's and Model 96's.  Then they did build some Model 98's.  Their commercially available actions were extremely nice, on par with the FN Belgium commercial Mauser Actions.  I often saw them sporting blonde maple stocks.  Sears for a while used commercial FN Belgium actions to make there sporting bolt rifles.  I have two of them.  They had a solid side, without the thumb charging notch cutout.  They are premium.  I seem to remember that Sears had High Standard barrel these for them.  I do not know the supplier of the stocks.  These were sold under the Sears J.C. Higgins moniker. Also, I am thinking that for a short while Sears made some short action rifles using a SAKO action, that Sears had barreled by HIgh Standard, and sold.  These would have been probably in .222 Remington, the hot caliber back in that day and time.  I also had a "Colt" bolt rifle from this era, that was built on a SAKO action.  I thought it was nice, and certainly worth something to a collector.  I bought it to flip.  I put it on Texas Gun Trader, and within MINUTES had a guy willing to drive fifty miles to me, and he didn't offer me a cent less than what I was asking for it.  I had priced it fairly according to the current at the time Blue Book price.  The guys that bought these guns back in the late fifties and sixties are sadly passing on, and these rifles do turn up at estate sales.  MM

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2019, 02:00:53 PM »
MM: Now that you mentioned blond maple stocks I believe that is what my Imperial grade had not walnut. They are a very handsome rifle. A local gas station owner was selling them for 10% over cost because he was mad that the sporting goods dealer was selling outboard motor oil. Most of them were the light weights and a few Imperials like I had.
John

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2019, 02:36:18 PM »
You're right about how much info you can get from the old Shooter's Bibles and Gun Digests.  My Dad has them for every year dating back to the 1950's.  Man I wish I could go back in time and buy some of those guns even if they were priced for today's prices.
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2019, 09:23:59 PM »
Think I found a picture of one. Attached it here.
Looks like it should work as good as my Dad's Husqvarna riding mowers did. Lol

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2019, 09:29:00 AM »
They also produced motorcycles, sewing machines and to this day highly regarded chain saws.

Somewhere on the net I found serial numbers at one time with manufacturing dates. Mine are all on 98s and as far as I know all CRF actions were FN. Mine are all really plain and were bought to build customs off but I ended up liking them and I am going to see how they shoot.
I shoot cases with a belt because I feel the other cartridges need to pull their trousers up.

Grouchy

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Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2019, 02:12:58 PM »
I have one of those chain saws, wouldn't trade it for a decent rifle! Learning that palm trees are easy cutting after sparks flying off citrus trees was hard learned lesson after the hurricanes here!  :)

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2019, 11:56:40 PM »
This topic has got the better of me bit and I'm disappointed to see that it seems that the resource with serial numbers etc. is gone from the web.

Okay... well I've updated this post... the benefit of being in an environment where you need to motivate firearm ownership to the extent that we do means that you often keep information, albeit sometimes in a haphazard fashion and sometimes you can back reference the motivation which you submitted with a licence / permit application. If you genlemen want to PM me serial numbers I should be able to give some feedback as to production dates of the older Huskys as well as the models. I seem to have info to 1970. I'm no Husky expert, but I researched them at one time and gathered information of people whom I thought to be knowledgeable and kept it. This included info from a Mauser Monthly found online and various forums.

Models then as follows (M98 based i.e. post 94 / 96 - got that too by the way) from what I can gather....

FN large ring actions on some models from the 1930's into the 1950's. The older action with the thumb cutout was used in the M146 / M246 / M646 / M648 / M649

The commercial FN action was introduced in the late 1940's and the new actions were used on

M646 - the 640 in 6.5x55
M648 - the 640 in 8x57JS
M649 - the 640 in 9.3x62 (this calibre designation from my serial number info)

Yes - I do see the overlap of the M646/8/9... it seems these used both old and new style FN actions and some references say also some M/38 Swedish actions.

The 1640 was released in 1953 and discontinued around 1967 and was designed as Husqvarna was uncomfortable to rely on a competitor to supply the action. This was still a CRF M98 type action. The 1900 was introduced in 1967 and was a PF - see the discussion below from De Haas' book for both of these as it seems that the various model numbers overlap, so the 1640 ACTION was used in various other rifle model designations (e.g. 3000/6000 RIFLE etc?) and the 1900 ACTION in the M8000 and M9000 RIFLE for example. In other words we must split out the rifle model and action model in discussion to avoid confusion. This from what I can see.

Quite recently I read an online article about a Husky as well and manged to find that link:http://www.rifleshootermag.com/editorial/featured_rifles_rs_sportingmauser_200806/83612#

What I also found today was this, which I think has a good summary of the Husqvarnas and it seems to line up with (most) of what I recalled:https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/8284559/Husquvarna_1640_640 - see the third post. I hope there is no issue in linking to other forums here?

I also had a look at my copy of Bolt Action Rifles by de Haas. There is information about the Husqvarna / Smith and Wesson rifles. Imported by Tradewinds in 1954 and built on a modified M98. Apparently models included an engraved presentation grade. De Haas also indicates that all production ceased in 1972. So, it seems that there was a CRF Husky made action that was NOT on an FN action which I had forgotten and which is also featured in the article I linked to.

There is then another chapter in the De Haas book on the Model 8000. This was introduced in 1969 and included an Imperial model which the writer describes as "quite impressive". There is also a M9000 Crown grade, which it seems was a plainer version than the Imperial. This it seems then was the 1900 action used on the M8000 and M9000 rifles.

This is a round bottomed, push feed action, with a plunger type ejector and with an extractor described as similar to the "Sako L-61". De Haas proceeds to say that the S&W rifle was based on this new action from the 1970 production year and only a few lines later indicates that he has no knowledge that S&W ever imported this model. Accordingly I am unable to follow whether the M8000 / M9000 series apparently made its way into the S&W rifles at any time.

I hope this adds a bit to this discussion. 


« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 12:38:10 AM by African Leadwood »
I shoot cases with a belt because I feel the other cartridges need to pull their trousers up.

zonie

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Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2019, 12:04:53 PM »
Very good info, my PH in Africa uses a Husky for plains game ,  I think it has at least 3 or 4 coats of varnish on the stock including varnish over run on the barrel,  still works , but I wonder what the stock looks like underneath all that varnish.  In any case good rifle and I sure wouldn't turn one down in good shape and decent price. 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2019, 04:28:52 PM by zonie »

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2019, 02:57:07 PM »
I wonder if someone put more polyurethane in it because I doubt any factory would let their rifle leave the factory like that.  When I bought my 8mm Remington Magnum which is a 700 BDL the stock was in rough shape and you couldn't see much of the grain because the polyurethane was so thick.  After it was stripped off the stock was really pretty and had a lot more figure to it than you'd ever expect.
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2019, 08:30:36 PM »
I got a used B that looked like someone used varnish and put it on with a straw broom. It took a lot of work but it looked great when I was done.
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M5 German 300
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zonie

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Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2019, 04:33:36 PM »
Older gun,  I'm sure it was varnished by him or someone in the family ,  looked like a kid painted it.  It's a tool to him doesn't have to look pretty just has to work.

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2019, 06:51:27 AM »
interesting, I should tell the brother, to take that one he has out of the safe, and take it to gun show, there might be someone wanting to but it for a custom project. It's been sitting in the safe for years, no one here has  use for mauser actions, wood stock rifles.

Rob
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synthetic-240 Wby
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Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2019, 05:19:50 PM »
I might be interested in it, how about some details and pictures.  Where is he located at?
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #28 on: January 11, 2019, 06:47:24 AM »
it's in northern Saskatchewan, the hassel of the paperwork, to get it there legally, likely not worth your time.

Rob
cfp-223REM
accumark-223Rem
ultralite-240 Wby
synthetic-240 Wby
synthetic-257 Wby
ultralite-270 Wby
fibermark-270 Wby
accumark-270 Wby
accumark-7mm Wby
stainless-300 Wby
fibermark-300Wby
accumark-30378 Wby
fibermark-340 Wby
accumark-338378 Wby
custom-375 Wby
DGR-378 Wby
DGR-416 Wby
custom DGR-460 Wby

Re: Husqvarna rifles
« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2019, 07:08:07 AM »
My nephew is living near Houston now and just had his Mom ship him his Browning BLR .284 Win down. They had to package it up and send it to a gun broker in British Columbia and they sent it to Texas. You can't take a gun south unless you have a hunting license I guess. I have bought rifles in Montana and just showed up at the border with rifle and my Possession and Acquisitions License a "PAL" and payed the taxes but now you can't buy in the USA because you can't get a FBI background check.
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