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Synthetic vs Wood

Synthetic vs Wood
« on: January 16, 2019, 02:48:15 PM »
Hello to all from NJ. I've hunted white tails most of my life and in NJ you can't even hunt with a center fire rifle. So, my experience is more limited than many. I do have a Sako .06. I hope to get a tag for an elk hunt in Wyoming zone 85 this year. I don't want to be in a situation where I have a shot at 400-500 yards and stand down because I bring my .06. I'm leaning towards a Mark V Altitude .300 wby mag. Any reason to over think synthetic vs a wood stock? Will lighter equal more recoil? Is there a measurable difference? I'm leaning towards lighter because at age 63 I'm not the bullet proof youngster of days of old. Thanks in advance for any guidance.

Blackbear3

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2019, 03:11:12 PM »
Welcome to the Nation!!! If your worried about weight and recoil, consider getting an ULW in 300 with a Accubrake. My ULW 6.5-300 came with a thread protector if I didn't want the brake on while hunting. I just carried my Arroyo in 340 around the mountains of Colorado at 65 and found the limiting factor was my physical condition and not the weight of the rifle. By the way your 06 would be just fine for elk at reasonable distances.
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Doug-NRA Life Member

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2019, 05:01:08 PM »
Question, have you been bring any shooting at 400-500 yards?
If so and you are  confident at those ranges than your 30-06 will do just fine.
If you want a new rifle than a 300 Weatherby is an excellent choice
Mike

dubyam

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2019, 05:21:38 PM »
I'll agree with the above advice regarding shooting distances.  The -06 is a fine rifle, with the right bullets for elk, and will kill at the ranges you mention.  The real question (as above, and regardless of whether you use your -06 or buy a 300Wby or whatever) is whether or not you have access to practice at 400 and 500yds, regularly.  If you do, you need to be sending rounds downrange with boring regularity, and you need to be able to make 1-1.5MOA groups at those distances from field positions (not from a lead sled or a bench rest or even a big pile of sandbags).  If you can maintain 1.5MOA at 500yds from prone over a daypack, off of shooting sticks (kneeling or standing), and using a post to steady yourself (like you might use a tree trunk in the field), you're set.  If you cannot practice at those ranges, you have absolutely zero business attempting a shot at those ranges on game.  You won't even know if your drop charts are realistic (and there's a good chance they're not, if you haven't shot out your range card prior to the hunt).  Maybe you know all this already, and if so, no offense intended.

If it were me, I'd think about something like the Weathermark as it will be plenty durable, and you won't be worried about dinging the stock.  It will weigh about 9.5-10lbs ready to shoot, so it won't be light.  But it will be a good compromise between weight and recoil.  I'm not a fan of brakes because I already have some hearing loss, and don't want to wear earplugs in the field, but perhaps you don't have that aversion.  If so, a ULW with a brake might be a good option.
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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2019, 07:42:18 PM »
Never one to talk anyone out of getting a new rifle especially in a 300 Weatherby if you are shooting long range or short range. The Altitude is one sharp looking lightweight rifle.You will definitely appreciate the brake that comes on the 300 as it will sure help on the recoil.I personally wouldn't want to shoot it without it.Weight does have an effect on recoil.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2019, 07:46:14 PM by terminator »
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eford

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2019, 08:30:48 PM »
Iíll vote for the 300 Wby over an -06. After practing the shots as Dub pointed out, you could easily have the confidence and knowledge of the external ballistics for a long shot. The 300ís energy at long distance outshines the -06. Use a monometal or bonded bullet built for big game such as elk and youíre set.
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Every man needs to know his limits.

Stacy

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2019, 09:48:07 PM »
I'm with the other posters in saying your 30-06 is plenty for elk. We kill moose in Alaska every year with 30-06s and as you know Moose are a bit bigger than Elk.  Bullet choice and shot placement are really important for optimum performance on game. 

With regards to wood vs synthetic, as I get older, I seem to appreciate a nicely figured walnut stock.  Synthetic stocks are practical and very stable in a variety of environments.  Weight of the two will vary based on style of stock and manufacturer.  Wood can be very stable too as long as it is properly sealed against the elements.

I would buy whichever rifle floats your boat. Nobody ever laid on their deathbed surrounded by family and friends wishing they hadn't bought a Weatherby rifle!!   ;D 
       

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2019, 05:14:32 AM »
With regards to wood vs synthetic, as I get older, I seem to appreciate a nicely figured walnut stock.  Synthetic stocks are practical and very stable in a variety of environments.  Weight of the two will vary based on style of stock and manufacturer.  Wood can be very stable too as long as it is properly sealed against the elements.       

+1. I am a wood stock guy, period. Occasionally I'll buy a plastic stocked rifle usually because of cost or a sale/deal. Eventually, I end up replacing the stock with a wood one and never look back. Wood is classic, traditional, and timeless. Non-wood stocks (ie: plastic, fiberglass, etc.) are contemporary, usually lighter, and sometimes tactical which is not my MO. That said, Weatherby has some great wood stocks even in their sporter models. I have a Mark V sporter with a ton of character.

The 300 Wby is a fantastic chambering that should serve you well. I shot a nice mature 8 point whitetail with mine the Saturday after thanksgiving. One shot. :)
JW

240 Wby Mag - Mauser 98 w/ ER Shaw Barrel 26"
257 Wby Mag - Vanguard Synthetic (Changed to walnut stock)
6.5-300 Wby Mag - Vanguard Synthetic Series II 26"
270 Wby Mag - Mark V Sporter
7mm Wby Mag - Mark V Sporter
300 Wby Mag - Vanguard Synthetic (Changed to walnut stock)

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2019, 05:46:18 AM »

The 30-06 is a formidable round. I have a Win Model 70 Featherweight in 30-06 and like the old ad slogan say's, I don't leave home without it. That said, I prefer my 300 WM for Elk because it is flatter shooting than my 06 and requires less holdover on the longer shots. When shot placement can mean the difference between a clean and ethical kill and a wounded animal I think the 300 WM gives me an advantage over the 06. I also think the felt recoil on the 06 is sharper than the 300 WM. I know for a fact that muzzle rise on the 06 easily exceeds the 300 WM.


As for Wood vs. Synthetic, I love wood and 4 of my 7 Weatherby's are Deluxes. I think my love for their wood is less than practical and more that my mind is trained to see a Weatherby in a beautiful, highly figured, wood stock. It just doesn't seem right when they are not. Some synthetic stocks are better than wood for things like durability and stability in multiple environments and then some are just crap. I think Weatherby has it figured out now and is using high quality synthetic stocks. I personally think that Bell and Carlson or McMillan non-wood stocks are the best there are and have not hesitated to buy rifles that have them.
Weatherby Rifles:
M5 USA .257
M5 USA 6.5-300
M5 USA 300
M5 German 300
M5 .308 TRR
VG .308
VG 270
Other:
Win M70 30-06
Brn XBolt HC Speed 300 WSM
McMil G30 Dynasty 270 WSM
Ber B-14 HMR 6.5 CM
Mar 1895 SBL 45-70
Win 94 pre 64 30-30
4 AR-15 Match 5.56
2 AR-15 Match Wylde .223
1 AR-10 Match .308

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2019, 06:49:12 AM »
I agree with what Mike and dubyam posted, unless you can hit your target's at 400-500 yards everytime shooting from field positions, why are you worrying about making a shot like that?  99.9% of elk are shot closer than that every year, dispite what the internet know-it all elk hunter's say, that you can't get an elk under 500 yards. Which most have never shot an elk before, or too lazy or out of shape to really hunt elk. I've seen this many times, when I used to work for a outfitter, either the client would be in not the best of shape or he would bring a new rifle that he wasn't comfortable or use to shooting, because some blowbag told him his 270 or 30-06, that he was used to, could not kill elk. Your 06 will be fine, practice shooting from field positions, and get in shape. You will have a great hunt.

Rob
cfp-223REM
accumark-223Rem
ultralite-240 Wby
synthetic-240 Wby
synthetic-257 Wby
ultralite-270 Wby
fibermark-270 Wby
accumark-270 Wby
accumark-7mm Wby
stainless-300 Wby
fibermark-300Wby
accumark-30378 Wby
fibermark-340 Wby
accumark-338378 Wby
custom-375 Wby
DGR-378 Wby
DGR-416 Wby
custom DGR-460 Wby

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2019, 11:06:23 AM »
I agree 100% with what dubyam posted about practicing at 400+ ranges from field positions.  You shouldn't take a shot at any animal at a distance farther than the distance that you can keep all of your shots inside a circle that is the size of the vitals of the animal that you are shooting at.  For an elk, that would be about a 15" circle.

In 40 years of hunting elk (and killing almost that many), I have never killed an elk farther away than 300 yards.

As for the ability of a .30-06 to kill elk, I killed 8 of my first 10 elk with a .30-06.

On the question of synthetic vs wood, I have always been a wood stock guy.  My current favorite rifle, which is also my dedicated elk rifle, is a blued .300 Weatherby Vanguard that I custom stocked in AA Fancy walnut.  Fully loaded and with its sling, it weighs 10 pounds.  It really hurts me to have this rifle out in the rain or a wet snow storm.

So for foul weather I have a backup rifle that is a Tupperware stocked stainless steel Remington 700 chambered in 7 mm Rem mag.  SS and synthetic will stand up to foul weather much better than blued/wood.

All else being equal, a lighter rifle will kick harder than a heavier rifle.  Some of the recoil is absorbed in the weight of the rifle.

I'm 3 weeks short of 73, and also not a spring chicken, so I'll carry my 10# rifle and lighten up my pack or better yet, loose a few of my own pounds.
NRA Endowment Life Member

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2019, 04:12:48 PM »
You have a LOT of good answers here. Lots. My question would be can you practice at the ranges youíre talking about in NJ? Have you shot rifles larger than 30-06? Iíve only shit one elk. It was in Montana and it was a one shot two step kill and it was with a Vanguard in 30-06.  Youíre better off using a rifle you know inside and out than a new one you have next to zero experience with. For your other question I would go synthetic over wood. Would never hesitate to discourage a new Weatherby purchase so look over the answers here and giveit some thought. Whatever you decide good luck.

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2019, 07:59:51 PM »
You have a LOT of good answers here. Lots. My question would be can you practice at the ranges youíre talking about in NJ? Have you shot rifles larger than 30-06? Iíve only shit one elk. It was in Montana and it was a one shot two step kill and it was with a Vanguard in 30-06.  Youíre better off using a rifle you know inside and out than a new one you have next to zero experience with. For your other question I would go synthetic over wood. Would never hesitate to discourage a new Weatherby purchase so look over the answers here and giveit some thought. Whatever you decide good luck.

Wow, that must have stung!  ;)

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2019, 08:01:26 PM »
You have a LOT of good answers here. Lots. My question would be can you practice at the ranges youíre talking about in NJ? Have you shot rifles larger than 30-06? Iíve only shit one elk. It was in Montana and it was a one shot two step kill and it was with a Vanguard in 30-06.  Youíre better off using a rifle you know inside and out than a new one you have next to zero experience with. For your other question I would go synthetic over wood. Would never hesitate to discourage a new Weatherby purchase so look over the answers here and giveit some thought. Whatever you decide good luck.

Wow, that must have stung!  ;)



Charmin would be of no help.

Weatherby Rifles:
M5 USA .257
M5 USA 6.5-300
M5 USA 300
M5 German 300
M5 .308 TRR
VG .308
VG 270
Other:
Win M70 30-06
Brn XBolt HC Speed 300 WSM
McMil G30 Dynasty 270 WSM
Ber B-14 HMR 6.5 CM
Mar 1895 SBL 45-70
Win 94 pre 64 30-30
4 AR-15 Match 5.56
2 AR-15 Match Wylde .223
1 AR-10 Match .308

danno50

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2019, 09:36:10 AM »
Welcome to the Nation. 1st off, we'ed do well to follow the solid advice that Dubyam's post offers on long range shooting, because without that kind of practice, none of us has any business shooting out to or past 400 yards. As to wood or synthetic? I love wood, light or dark, as long as it has some handsome figure. Addressing age (63 is the new 45) if, if the total rifle weight package is a major concern, in most cases wood stock packages will be heavier than synthetic. I'm on board with Blackbear and would choose the Ulta-Lite over the Altitude, they both have brakes which will reduce recoil to -06 level, just a bit louder. Hearing, "Protect it or Lose it". The Altitude is about $700 more and what you're paying for is a bit more expensive stock and pattern and a bit more expensive finish on the barrel. Personally, I would choose the 300 Wby over the -06. The the Altitude and the Ultra-lite both in -06 come with a #1 contour barrel which means that consecutive shot per consecutive shot the -06 barrel will heat up faster and the #1 contour may be a bit more "Finicky" with different loads while trying to achieve good accuracy. You get more of everything with the 300Wby, and the same recoil as the -06. Wood vs Synthetic? If you compare only in looks, the wood wins every time, but from a practical standpoint including total weight, the synthetic gets the nod. Order the 300Wby in Ultra-Lite and with one rifle, you can do it all. You won't be disappointed. JMO
« Last Edit: January 25, 2019, 05:53:11 AM by danno50 »
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