Spike Camp

Synthetic vs Wood

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2019, 12:08:26 PM »
Thanks to all for the benefit of your experiences.  If I'm fortunate enough to pull an elk tag I'll have to make the choice of either synthetic or wood (which I love) but as you all know, the time of year and environments we hunt elk in aren't conducive to pleasant weather. I'll feel like I'm at a restaurant and don't know what I'm going to order until the waiter has pen poised. In the spirit of sportsmanship I will seek out a range that offers a range with a distance of 500yds. My local range is only 300yds. Again, thank you all very much. I'll follow up as this unfolds.

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2019, 07:21:01 AM »
I've just purchased a formerly owned (but not yet received) DGR in .300 wby mag at a very nice price. Wondering if anyone knows if the barrel comes threaded for an Accubrake?

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2019, 08:16:24 AM »
Those are very nice. The 300 doesn't come threaded to my knowledge.
Roger
Faster horses,younger women,older whiskey,and more money.

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2019, 10:15:07 AM »
I agree 100% with what dubyam posted about practicing at 400+ ranges from field positions.  You shouldn't take a shot at any animal at a distance farther than the distance that you can keep all of your shots inside a circle that is the size of the vitals of the animal that you are shooting at.  For an elk, that would be about a 15" circle.

In 40 years of hunting elk (and killing almost that many), I have never killed an elk farther away than 300 yards.

As for the ability of a .30-06 to kill elk, I killed 8 of my first 10 elk with a .30-06.

On the question of synthetic vs wood, I have always been a wood stock guy.  My current favorite rifle, which is also my dedicated elk rifle, is a blued .300 Weatherby Vanguard that I custom stocked in AA Fancy walnut.  Fully loaded and with its sling, it weighs 10 pounds.  It really hurts me to have this rifle out in the rain or a wet snow storm.

So for foul weather I have a backup rifle that is a Tupperware stocked stainless steel Remington 700 chambered in 7 mm Rem mag.  SS and synthetic will stand up to foul weather much better than blued/wood.

All else being equal, a lighter rifle will kick harder than a heavier rifle.  Some of the recoil is absorbed in the weight of the rifle.

I'm 3 weeks short of 73, and also not a spring chicken, so I'll carry my 10# rifle and lighten up my pack or better yet, loose a few of my own pounds.

Moving from an eastern state to Wyoming back in the 70's I brought my only high power rifle with me.  It was a Savage 99 chambered in .300 Savage.  That rifle killed 4 elk, 3 of them with one shot.  None over 175 yds.  I chuckle when I hear that this or that caliber doesn't have enough power to kill an elk.

Now that I'm starting to show my age (I'll be 76 next month) I do less walking and hill climbing.  Over the years I've found where the elk tend to transit from one area to another I just sit and wait for them to come to me.  My two favorite elk rifles are my .300 MK V and a M 700 in .35 Whelen.

Just for the record, I did kill one nice bull in the grassy lake area between Yellowstone and Teton parks with a #1 Ruger in .25-06.  After later learning that is one of the grizzly hot spots I realized how lucky I was and never tried that stunt again.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2019, 10:28:37 AM by Dino82520 »

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Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2019, 03:52:41 PM »
I agree 100% with what dubyam posted about practicing at 400+ ranges from field positions.  You shouldn't take a shot at any animal at a distance farther than the distance that you can keep all of your shots inside a circle that is the size of the vitals of the animal that you are shooting at.  For an elk, that would be about a 15" circle.

In 40 years of hunting elk (and killing almost that many), I have never killed an elk farther away than 300 yards.

As for the ability of a .30-06 to kill elk, I killed 8 of my first 10 elk with a .30-06.

On the question of synthetic vs wood, I have always been a wood stock guy.  My current favorite rifle, which is also my dedicated elk rifle, is a blued .300 Weatherby Vanguard that I custom stocked in AA Fancy walnut.  Fully loaded and with its sling, it weighs 10 pounds.  It really hurts me to have this rifle out in the rain or a wet snow storm.

So for foul weather I have a backup rifle that is a Tupperware stocked stainless steel Remington 700 chambered in 7 mm Rem mag.  SS and synthetic will stand up to foul weather much better than blued/wood.

All else being equal, a lighter rifle will kick harder than a heavier rifle.  Some of the recoil is absorbed in the weight of the rifle.

I'm 3 weeks short of 73, and also not a spring chicken, so I'll carry my 10# rifle and lighten up my pack or better yet, loose a few of my own pounds.

Moving from an eastern state to Wyoming back in the 70's I brought my only high power rifle with me.  It was a Savage 99 chambered in .300 Savage.  That rifle killed 4 elk, 3 of them with one shot.  None over 175 yds.  I chuckle when I hear that this or that caliber doesn't have enough power to kill an elk.

Now that I'm starting to show my age (I'll be 76 next month) I do less walking and hill climbing.  Over the years I've found where the elk tend to transit from one area to another I just sit and wait for them to come to me.  My two favorite elk rifles are my .300 MK V and a M 700 in .35 Whelen.

Just for the record, I did kill one nice bull in the grassy lake area between Yellowstone and Teton parks with a #1 Ruger in .25-06.  After later learning that is one of the grizzly hot spots I realized how lucky I was and never tried that stunt again.
The very first night in elk camp, my outfitter and long time friend discussed Grizzly. The three S's were the center of that talk, shoot, shovel and silence. One of the hunters said he would tell about the dead bear. I said 'well you must have shot it to know so much!"  Probably why I would tend to carry a bigger than necessary rifle on  elk hunt!  The guides were unarmed.   :)

gwebb

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2019, 04:18:21 PM »
If I were in your place I would use your 30-.06 or if you want a new rifle I would look more at a .340. I think a .340 is a much better step up than a .300 and I've found that the kick is about the same. BTW i'm 79.

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2019, 08:39:47 AM »
Get the one that makes your heart jump.  I have only hunted with wood Mark V's and now have shot my daughter's wood stock Camilla.  My Dad has a 40+ year old Mark V 300 and has hunted thick PA woods in the east and all over the west for Mule Deer and Elk the entire time. While his Mark V is a bit dinged up, every ding has a story, and the gun still looks absolutely stunning, dings and all. 

I guess in the end, get the one that looks like something you'd be proud to have in your gun cabinet, and admire.    That's my take anyway.    Good luck and have fun!

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2019, 02:09:34 PM »
I've just purchased a formerly owned (but not yet received) DGR in .300 wby mag at a very nice price. Wondering if anyone knows if the barrel comes threaded for an Accubrake?
Congrats on getting a .300 Wby.  The Weatherby web page shows that some of the DGR rifles come with an Accubrake, but it doesn't specify which calibers.

I had a local gunsmith install KDF brakes that are the same diameter as the muzzle on two of my rifles, including my .300 Wby Vanguard.  This brake cuts the felt recoil of my .300 Wby down to about the same as my .308 Win.
NRA Endowment Life Member

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2019, 03:00:14 PM »
Weatherby will install an accubrake on any rifle. You send the barreled action in and they thread the barrel and install the brake. The price is on their website. I have a 300 with a brake and one without and the felt recoil difference is significant. I can make my own brakes and thread barrels so at some time I may also do my 6.5-300.
Weatherby Rifles:
M5 USA .257
M5 USA 6.5-300
M5 USA 300
M5 German 300
M5 .308 TRR
VG .308
VG 270
Other:
Win M70 30-06
Brn XBolt HC Speed 300 WSM
McMil G30 Dynasty 270 WSM
Ber B-14 HMR 6.5 CM
Mar 1895 SBL 45-70
Win 94 pre 64 30-30
4 AR-15 Match 5.56
2 AR-15 Match Wylde .223
1 AR-10 Match .308

Re: Synthetic vs Wood
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2019, 09:11:39 AM »
As everyone is saying the good old 06 will take them out that's for sure. Imo the 300 magnum is also a great cartridge with a little more swat when it gets there. My first elk was shot at 75 yds with a 7 rem after chirping a few times on a cow call and bringing him in from about 400 yds in the rut. I'm not saying don't buy the 300 Wby but if you do get him in that close it will darn near lift his feet off the ground when hit by a 180 gr or bigger projectile and that's what I would want take him off his feet because it would give a little more time for a follow up if needed i doubt with a 300 Wby you would need it with good shot placement. I don't know that country that your hunting but if it is the foothills or mountains the wind has a tendency to swirl around you start your stalk with the wind in your face walk 100 yds then it magically changes directions and that is where you will really appreciate the Weatherby part of your hunt. As for me hunting in sub zero temp wood isn't as cold and it just looks like a nice traditional rifle.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 09:14:14 AM by northern hunter »