Spike Camp

Lets change the term break in to conditioning

Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« on: February 09, 2019, 07:53:33 PM »

So there I was, reading through the manual on my new Barrett and when it comes to break in, I think they nailed it. They simply say that there is no required break in from a warranty aspect but they have found that the rifle is most accurate after several rounds have been fired.


I started thinking about this and suddenly the light bulb went on. Today's barrel makers lap the bore prior to cutting the rifling and then lap it again after. The one place that never gets lapped are the groves themselves but they are smooth enough for the rifle to shoot accurately enough for the average shooter. Because they are not lapped smooth copper will remain in them after each shot until finally the fired bullets have polished them. If you want to expedite the smoothing then you clean out the copper/carbon frequently so that the bullet is running on the barrel and not a build up of copper.


As the groves become more and more polished, the copper left behind becomes less and less and so once polished, copper fouling should become less of an issue then it was when the bore was new.


Because of this epiphany I suggest that we refer to the process as conditioning since in reality a bore will eventually become conditioned with or without a break in process.


Of course there is the possibility that I have finally gone totally bat crazy and this post is the evidence.. Ha Ha..

Weatherby Rifles:
M5 USA .257
M5 USA 6.5-300
M5 USA 300
M5 German 300
M5 .308 TRR
VG .308
VG 270
Other:
Win M70 30-06
Brn XBolt HC Speed 300 WSM
McMil G30 Dynasty 270 WSM
Ber B-14 HMR 6.5 CM
Mar 1895 SBL 45-70
Win 94 pre 64 30-30
4 AR-15 Match 5.56
2 AR-15 Match Wylde .223
1 AR-10 Match .308

BB340

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Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 06:11:04 PM »
Yeah you have gone bat crazy!! But what you say is true.
Aussie gun nut.

Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2019, 07:06:35 PM »
Yeah you have gone bat crazy!! But what you say is true.



Ha Ha or ROFLOL for those of you that don't remember what Ha Ha means. 
Weatherby Rifles:
M5 USA .257
M5 USA 6.5-300
M5 USA 300
M5 German 300
M5 .308 TRR
VG .308
VG 270
Other:
Win M70 30-06
Brn XBolt HC Speed 300 WSM
McMil G30 Dynasty 270 WSM
Ber B-14 HMR 6.5 CM
Mar 1895 SBL 45-70
Win 94 pre 64 30-30
4 AR-15 Match 5.56
2 AR-15 Match Wylde .223
1 AR-10 Match .308

Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2019, 07:34:28 PM »
Sounds like that's trying to be politically correct.  LOL  As the saying goes if it's not broke don't fix it and since most people know it as breaking in the barrel I don't see any reason to change the terminology. 
Nothing is better than a Weatherby, big bore magnum, or a Colt.

Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2019, 12:35:06 PM »
Break-in / conditioning.....same difference.

danno50

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Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2019, 02:23:08 PM »
 Conditioning is what's happening, breaking in is what your doing, with or without a break-in process. I think I'll have to side with BB on this one,  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
 
Yeah you have gone bat crazy!! But what you say is true.
ROFLOL
DosEquisShooter

Re: Lets change the term break in to conditioning
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2019, 05:03:57 AM »
"Today's barrel makers lap the bore prior to cutting the rifling and then lap it again after".

That statement is true for custom cut and button rifling barrel manufacturers but certainly not true for hammer forged rifle barrels which is what the process used by majority of rifle manufacturers.