Spike Camp

Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?

Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2020, 01:34:47 PM »
Maasjod, You can find most of the stuff used from Gun Broker or ebay. I use an RCBS press with primer tool attached, Lyman scale and Lyman case trimmer. Try to make sure your press has the priming tool attachment as pictured, that makes it nice as it's always there when you need it. A reloading manual is also nice to have handy or you can look up load data online.
Godscountry is that a cast iron primer catcher? That has got to be old.

It's cast aluminum and yes, I've had it a good while.
I had never seen anything but plastic. Thanks for the reply
Good Hunting And Shooting To all
Derrill

Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2020, 07:59:02 PM »
Maasjod, You can find most of the stuff used from Gun Broker or ebay. I use an RCBS press with primer tool attached, Lyman scale and Lyman case trimmer. Try to make sure your press has the priming tool attachment as pictured, that makes it nice as it's always there when you need it. A reloading manual is also nice to have handy or you can look up load data online.

What about a micrometer? Also Iím sure I could find something on line but how do you measure your bullet jump?

224KING

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2020, 08:40:26 PM »
Maasjod, You can find most of the stuff used from Gun Broker or ebay. I use an RCBS press with primer tool attached, Lyman scale and Lyman case trimmer. Try to make sure your press has the priming tool attachment as pictured, that makes it nice as it's always there when you need it. A reloading manual is also nice to have handy or you can look up load data online.

What about a micrometer? Also Iím sure I could find something on line but how do you measure your bullet jump?



Set of calipers. Your cleaning rod with tape over the hole so the tip of your bullet doesn't go up in it when you are measuring the free bore.Do I need to go thru the whole process?
Remember 10534

Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2020, 09:14:09 AM »
Okay, just loaded my first 160g Woodleigh, 82g WC 867. WOW! 3252 fps, way too fast, high pressure signs, bolt a little tight opening, primer flattened and mushroomed, ejector indented the case (see pic). I think I better drop to 79 or 80g and see what happens. The Wby site stated 82 grains for the Hornady 160 round nose, way too much powder for the Woodleigh 160. Oh, the temp outside while shooting was 23F.

That's a 340 case necked down to 6.5-300, in case you're wondering about the 340 on the case.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 09:16:15 AM by godscountry »
I love the smell of deer guts in the morning, it smells like...VICTORY!

224KING

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2020, 11:07:47 AM »
How much do you have to trim off the 340 neck after you shrink them to 6.5mm,and do they get thicker too?That might be some of ypour high pressure problem with that load you tried.
Remember 10534

Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

Everyone has a photographic memory.Some just don't have film.

Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2020, 11:12:36 AM »
I did have to trim a couple thousand off the length and had to ream the inside diameter a little. I bought a 6.5 reamer just for this round. Only problem is the Wilson reamer states to ream AFTER shooting so I can't ream until I shoot the first load from the necked down 340 case. I tried reaming the necked down case right after necking down, only problem was the bullet fell right into the case. So I've got to fire one round through the 340 case before I can ream it.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 09:17:56 AM by godscountry »
I love the smell of deer guts in the morning, it smells like...VICTORY!

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2020, 11:15:29 AM »
Sounds like you got'er covered.Hope you have a winner with accuracy.Might have to play with seating depth a little if you are getting low SD's on velocity
Remember 10534

Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

Everyone has a photographic memory.Some just don't have film.

zonie

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2020, 09:37:23 PM »
Not a be too critical I've seen my dad do the same thing 60 years ago, back then they just scooped powder,  the old saying was you can't get enough 4831 in that case to blow it up,  that was a load of houy.   I've got one of his old silver soldered handle to a brass military case that he used to scoop powders, that's how these guys re-loaded back then.   The way they got some of their powders you couldn't believe,  they would get belts of 50 cal ammo pull the bullets, dump the powder, and then put a boot stepping  on the empty 50 cal case  with a small hatchet to the primer and then hit it with a hammer.   I was thinking about that a couple years back and was just shaking my head what these old old timers use to do.  Just be careful there is a difference between pull down or surplus powders and off the shelf canister grade powders.  My understanding military powders are not tested the same  amount of times as compared to over the counter civilian canister grade powders.  A lot of people use surplus powders and get away with it,   they say lot to lot variations are more prone in surplus powders ,  I guess the best way to put it when working with pull down or surplus powders it would be best to re-work up loads when changing powder lots and of course that goes for canister grade powders also.  That looks like a pretty stiff load you got there.  Some of the old late 1800,   6.5 Mausers had a rifling twist of  1 : 7.87  and they were using 160's , but the rifling was a whole lot deeper back then as compared to today's standards.  I'd be curious what kind of accuracy you would be getting with the 160's ,  good luck and keep us posted.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 07:32:38 AM by zonie »

Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2020, 05:33:10 AM »
Not a be too critical I've seen my dad do the same thing 60 years ago, back then they just scooped powder,  the old saying was you can't get enough 4831 in that case to blow it up,  that was a load of houy.   I've got one of his old silver soldered handle to a brass military case that he used to scoop powders, that's how these guys re-loaded back then.   The way they got some of their powders you couldn't believe,  they would get belts of 50 cal ammo pull the bullets, dump the powder, and then put a boot stepping  on the empty 50 cal case  with a small hatchet to the primer and then hit it with a hammer.   I was thinking about that a couple years back and was just shaking my head what these old old timers use to do.  Just be careful there is a difference between pull down or surplus powders and off the shelf canister grade powders.  My understanding military powders are not tested the same  amount of times as compared to over the counter civilian canister grade powders.  A lot of people use surplus powders and get away with it,   they say lot to lot variations are more prone in surplus powders ,  I guess the best way to put it when working with pull down or surplus powders it would be best to re-work up loads when changing powder lots and of course that goes for canister grade powders also.  That looks like a pretty stiff load you got there.  Some of the old late 1800,   6.5 Mausers had a rifling twist of 7.87 : 1  and they were using 160's , but the rifling was a whole lot deeper back than as compared to today's standards.  I'd be curious what kind of accuracy you would be getting with the 160's ,  good luck and keep us posted.

That's how my gf's father used to reload, for his rifles. Only used the old lee hand loaders, sized, deprimed, and primed the case using a hammer, fill the case until the bottom of the neck with 4831(hodgdon or IMR it didn't matter  :o) and seat the bullet using the hammer. Pretty crude by today standards but it work for him for many years.

I'm not surprised to see 82 gr being hot, the WC867 that I got, is basicly H870, and from what I heard US869 is a little slower burning. I figured 3000-3100 fps would be about the limit for the 160's. Still would make a great elk load, be interesting to see the what the accuracy is.

Rob
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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2020, 06:44:25 AM »
Maasjod, You can find most of the stuff used from Gun Broker or ebay. I use an RCBS press with primer tool attached, Lyman scale and Lyman case trimmer. Try to make sure your press has the priming tool attachment as pictured, that makes it nice as it's always there when you need it. A reloading manual is also nice to have handy or you can look up load data online.

What about a micrometer? Also Iím sure I could find something on line but how do you measure your bullet jump?



Set of calipers. Your cleaning rod with tape over the hole so the tip of your bullet doesn't go up in it when you are measuring the free bore.Do I need to go thru the whole process?

No I'll figure it out. No Need to make you explain the whole process. I'll learn. I was just curious how that worked and I was too lazy to google it. I'm going to try and find a decent press and scale. And then start purchasing the other necessities. Thanks for the help.

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2020, 06:08:56 PM »
Not a be too critical I've seen my dad do the same thing 60 years ago, back then they just scooped powder,  the old saying was you can't get enough 4831 in that case to blow it up,  that was a load of houy.   I've got one of his old silver soldered handle to a brass military case that he used to scoop powders, that's how these guys re-loaded back then.   The way they got some of their powders you couldn't believe,  they would get belts of 50 cal ammo pull the bullets, dump the powder, and then put a boot stepping  on the empty 50 cal case  with a small hatchet to the primer and then hit it with a hammer.   I was thinking about that a couple years back and was just shaking my head what these old old timers use to do.  Just be careful there is a difference between pull down or surplus powders and off the shelf canister grade powders.  My understanding military powders are not tested the same  amount of times as compared to over the counter civilian canister grade powders.  A lot of people use surplus powders and get away with it,   they say lot to lot variations are more prone in surplus powders ,  I guess the best way to put it when working with pull down or surplus powders it would be best to re-work up loads when changing powder lots and of course that goes for canister grade powders also.  That looks like a pretty stiff load you got there.  Some of the old late 1800,   6.5 Mausers had a rifling twist of  1 : 7.87  and they were using 160's , but the rifling was a whole lot deeper back then as compared to today's standards.  I'd be curious what kind of accuracy you would be getting with the 160's ,  good luck and keep us posted.




My favorite load in a 224 mag is a no weigh powder charge.Fill the case and seat the bullet.It has been the most accurate load I've found that has worked great in every 224 I've ever trued it in.And that's a bunch of them.
Remember 10534

Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

Everyone has a photographic memory.Some just don't have film.

zonie

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2020, 08:56:50 PM »
A lot of people load by volume and never have any problems, but for the most part they also check and  double check powder weights just to be sure.  Commercial electric / mechanical automatic loading machine load by volume , but also have safety powder checks built into the system, and loads are tested.  Commercial Ammoload or Camdex  machines are built this way and no doubt the big ammo companies one off loading machines built in house,  and there are some  home re-loader type  multi station manual or self indexing loading presses  which have powder check systems as accessories if a person chooses to add them,  my little Dillon 650 has a powder check that alerts with sound.  The point is if you know what you doing and aware of any pitfalls a lot of things are doable., but it also doesn't mean everyone should jump right in and start doing things that really might not be the safest thing.  Case in point even volume powder dropping / measuring  with light charge weights in certain calibers and powders can be down right dangerous.  There is a guy down here gunsmith took his hand off by not following safety procedures IMO,  I guess using someones elses re-loads with the wrong powder in it while testing a rifle from what people have said, one little mistake is all it takes.  There are people out there that are fully capable of re-loading on the edges and that's not a bad thing IMO , they take the responsibility upon themselves if they make mistakes. 
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 09:23:49 PM by zonie »

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2020, 09:19:37 PM »
It is definitely something that a novice or junior reloader should do by any means.I just happened to run into a load that filled the cases that gave good velocities and is very accurate in just about all the Varmintmasters I've tried it in.
Remember 10534

Sorry... Yesterday was the last and final day for any and all complaints whatsoever.

I try to avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

Everyone has a photographic memory.Some just don't have film.

zonie

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Re: Has anyone loaded 160 grain Woodleigh bullets in their 6.5-300?
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2020, 09:44:23 PM »
I totally get that one,  I've sand bagged enough guns and hid behind vehicles with strings attached to the triggers,  we've done some real oddball stuff when I was heavy into it.  Guy's use to shorten revolver cases by a lot it made for some what faster reloading of the weapon, we had no data on this stuff and we were using really non tested powders to get the correct velocities in these short cases,   same with shotgun cases cutting and skiving hulls to shorten them to get more ammo in the shotguns for combat matches.  back in the day guy's and gals were using some really hot 38 super re-loaded ammo to make major and for the most part everyone marked their own brass so it didn't get mixed up with someone elses.   I've bulged cases so bad on not so hot loaded 10mm auto pistol by just changing powders to Hodgdons universal when I should have stuck with HS7 .  These universal powder loaded cases were bulged in Colts 1911  unsupported chamber and normal reloading sizing dies could not size them back down to specs, I had to call an old friend at Magma and order a special carbide sidzng die that punches completely thru the  sizing die  case base  first, sizing the rim,  case head,  the bulge and everything else back to size, some were so badly bulged it rolled and folded the bulged section of the brass case back onto itself,  those were weird looking cases when sized, totally destroyed some of the  brass when sized,  these are automatic sizing  machines designed mainly for rimless pistol cases and they do a great job of sizing the lower sections of the cases back to specs to where your normal sizing dies takes over to complete the job,  not to be used on rimmed cases there are other machines designed for roll sizing. 
« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 08:30:11 AM by zonie »