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Barrel cleaning

.257

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Barrel cleaning
« on: July 10, 2020, 07:27:55 AM »
I know this topic has been discussed many times. But l would like too be a little more in depth.
How often do you clean your rifle, and why? Have you done a test to see when accuracy was affected? Or do you just clean at a set time or number of rounds.

I try too clean my Weatherby caliber's  at 100 rounds. This is based on match shooting at you can go that long between cleanings.
I did a test with a 7mm Weatherby and Barnes bullets. Accuracy was effected at around 300 rounds.
I also tested a 204 Ruger this week. Wyoming PD's, took the cleaning supplies but waited until l could see accuracy change before cleaning. Shot around 375 rounds and never seen any difference in accuracy out to 400 yards.

Another question is how thorough of a cleaning do you do? And why?
I do clean my rifles at times until l feel they are completely clean. But most times l do not. I clean until there is still a hint of fouling left. The reasoning for this is. After a thorough cleaning my rifles will take a few rounds to be back on target, depending on rifle, anything from 2-to 12 rounds to settle down again.
With a cleaning but leaving a little fouling in the barrel l found l can start with round 1 on target.

Thoughts, input, and please include your reason why you have chosen this routine
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2020, 08:51:07 AM »
In the high humidity here, I clean after most every use. I also wipe them down with oil every six months if not being used in that time frame. My EDC get wiped down more often. Humidity is 70% right now.  :)

Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2020, 10:52:37 AM »
Talk about timming Mike.
I have my 1st varmint leauge shoot of the year this Sunday.
So once A year I clean my target rifle real through.  I used a bronze brush 3 times. Even 1 oversized. Over a 2 day period ran 100 or so soaked patches with BTE. 2 applications of J B bore paste. And still can't get it completely clean.
I never can. Every year I just say good enough for who its for.  We shoot 25 rounds per match. And I shoot 6 of the 7 matches. So about 150 rounds A year.
I almost started my own post on what does it take to get A rifle clean.
We are allowed 5 sighters. I will use 3 of those just to foul and heat up the barrel before my 1st shot for score. That seems to work for this rifle.
Mark

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2020, 11:25:10 AM »
I'm pretty anal about barrel cleaning and clean them more than I really should.  I think it depends on the gun itself,  my handguns I always clean after shooting, shotguns same thing.   Most of our rifles I  don't shoot all of mine  so I won't let them sit dirty it could be years before I get to shoot these specific rifles again.  The rifles I  do shoot on a somewhat regular basis in testing  or if they are new rifles needing rounds down the barrel to smooth  them out a little  i'll clean after each use.   Proven rifles I plan on hunting  or just playing with during the year  I won't clean until they get really dirty (no specific round count), then I will get every bit of fouling out including copper.   I rarely clean a barrel before a hunt and if I do I will fire a few fouling rounds down the barrel and let it sit until the hunt comes.   Most of the time I'll let the chemicals do their job loosening the copper, depending upon gun (known heavier copper fouling guns) I will run swabs of  JB paste & JB bore bright down the bore then confirm copper is completely out with BTE or Ammonia based cleaners.   I do use KG 12 as a copper remover even though it's harder to use and needs Ammonia based or BTE to validate copper is complete out.  KG- 12  actually eats copper so it's a must to follow directions, and that goes for all chemical bore cleaners as not to damage rifle barrels and blueing.   There are times when I will take a 100 % copper scrub pad, cut little sections of the pad  with it's sharp edges and wrap a slightly undersized  bronze brush to hasten lead removal from barrels,  I have done the same for copper removal but I'm way more careful in rifle barrels (they do make copper coated steel scrub pads never use this type ).   NEVER NEVER will I use any stainless brush in any barrel,   Revolver stainless steel  cylinder brushes I do use sparingly but only in the revolvers cylinder, never in an automatic or single shot.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2020, 09:05:49 PM by zonie »

Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2020, 03:37:48 PM »
Talk about timming Mike.
I have my 1st varmint leauge shoot of the year this Sunday.
So once A year I clean my target rifle real through.  I used a bronze brush 3 times. Even 1 oversized. Over a 2 day period ran 100 or so soaked patches with BTE. 2 applications of J B bore paste. And still can't get it completely clean.
I never can. Every year I just say good enough for who its for.  We shoot 25 rounds per match. And I shoot 6 of the 7 matches. So about 150 rounds A year.
I almost started my own post on what does it take to get A rifle clean.
We are allowed 5 sighters. I will use 3 of those just to foul and heat up the barrel before my 1st shot for score. That seems to work for this rifle.

Mark if your using a Bronze brush with BTE it will give you a false positive reading, switch to nylon and you'll notice a difference.
Mike I usually do a complete cleaning after a 50-60 rounds or so with my rifles, except for my 223 and 5.56-those I clean at 200 rounds. I can't say I have ever noticed a drop off in accuracy, I just can't stand the thought of a really dirty barrel. I always put a patch with Marvel Mystery oil thru the barrel before I put them away before winter, just because that's what my Dad always did.
Doug

Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2020, 04:17:44 PM »
I gernerally clean mine after appx 30 rounds are gone. I'm not that anal on copper, as when you fire the first round after cleaning the copper is back, but the carbon scares me. In particular the so called carbon ring. Once this forms it is very hard to get cleaned. So after 30 rounds I try my best to get all carbon removed. I use Boretech C4 for the carbon as well as CLR and Boretech Cu+2 for the copper. I find them both work great.

Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2020, 06:24:39 PM »
I try to clean after every use.I soak a nylon brush in hoppes, push it once through and let it sit a few minutes. Then I wrap a cleaning patch around the brush and run a few through till itís fairly clean. Then I put hoppes oil on a brush wrapped with a cleaning patch . One stroke through. Then run about three patches through till Iím sure itís dry. I stick a cleaning rag in the magazine and force it close to the chamber to try and keep run off out. My brother almost bought a used 300 weatherby from a co-worker. He took it to a gunsmith and had it bore scoped. Barrel was shot. Chunks missing out of the rifling. Gunsmith said probably from lack of cleaning. Definitely takes a few fowlers in my experience to bring accuracy back. Some more than others

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2020, 08:17:17 PM »
For starters I use the Tipton bore guide to protect the bore and the action of the rifle from any solvent or oil overflow into the action or the finish of your rifle while keeping the cleaning rod properly aligned.(centered in the barrel) I also use Tipton carbon fiber rods for barrel protection. There are different diameter rods for the different bore sizes. I usually do a light cleaning after each range session. (except for the last range session leading into the hunting season then don't touch em)  Using Hoppe's #9 powder solvent, I scrub the throat a little bit with a nylon brush and do the same with the bore. Then I run a couple of tight solvent patches through throat and barrel. Run a few dry patches through to get the solvent out, then a light oil patch to finish. I generally don't use a copper solvent until my groups start going south, cause copper cleaner tends to take it down to the bone. That kind of cleaning can cause some of my rifles to take anywhere from 3 to 9+ shots to foul the barrel properly again to get my groups tight. (I agree with 257 on that)  Nealm66 I would suggest trading in that cleaning rag you put in the magazine weld for a bore guide kit that can be used on all your rifles. They really are a great tool to have. 
DosEquisShooter

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2020, 08:49:17 PM »
I try to clean the bore with Hoppes #9 on a nylon brush wrapped with a clean patch after shooting. Itís basically a mop. Usually I get it done the same day I shoot but not always. (I keep the barrel fouled through deer season.) The Hoppes keeps crud from building up and has some copper removing abilities. I donít oil the bore afterward. Rust in the bore is not an issue here due to the low humidity.
RL-19 or -22 might be the dirtiest powders I use. Theyíre effective, but have a lot more carbon / black, flaky residue than others such as H-1000, H-4831 or RL-26
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.257

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2020, 05:22:40 AM »
In the high humidity here, I clean after most every use. I also wipe them down with oil every six months if not being used in that time frame. My EDC get wiped down more often. Humidity is 70% right now.  :)

That's a good point. Humidity isn't an issue where l live but for some folks like you it is
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2020, 05:26:36 AM »
Talk about timming Mike.
I have my 1st varmint leauge shoot of the year this Sunday.
So once A year I clean my target rifle real through.  I used a bronze brush 3 times. Even 1 oversized. Over a 2 day period ran 100 or so soaked patches with BTE. 2 applications of J B bore paste. And still can't get it completely clean.
I never can. Every year I just say good enough for who its for.  We shoot 25 rounds per match. And I shoot 6 of the 7 matches. So about 150 rounds A year.
I almost started my own post on what does it take to get A rifle clean.
We are allowed 5 sighters. I will use 3 of those just to foul and heat up the barrel before my 1st shot for score. That seems to work for this rifle.

Our findings and methods are about the same
That would be a good topic for a post, or we could add it too this one
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2020, 05:32:06 AM »
I'm pretty anal about barrel cleaning and clean them more than I really should.  I think it depends on the gun itself,  my handguns I always clean after shooting, shotguns same thing.   Most of our rifles I  don't shoot all of mine  so I won't let them sit dirty it could be years before I get to shoot these specific rifles again.  The rifles I  do shoot on a somewhat regular basis in testing  or if they are new rifles needing rounds down the barrel to smooth  them out a little  i'll clean after each use.   Proven rifles I plan on hunting  or just playing with during the year  I won't clean until they get really dirty (no specific round count), then I will get every bit of fouling out including copper.   I rarely clean a barrel before a hunt and if I do I will fire a few fouling rounds down the barrel and let it sit until the hunt comes.   Most of the time I'll let the chemicals do their job loosening the copper, depending upon gun (known heavier copper fouling guns) I will run swabs of  JB paste & JB bore bright down the bore then confirm copper is completely out with BTE or Ammonia based cleaners.   I do use KG 12 as a copper remover even though it's harder to use and needs Ammonia based or BTE to validate copper is complete out.  KG- 12  actually eats copper so it's a must to follow directions, and that goes for all chemical bore cleaners as not to damage rifle barrels and blueing.   There are times when I will take a 100 % copper scrub pad, cut little sections of the pad  with it's sharp edges and wrap a slightly undersized  bronze brush to hasten lead removal from barrels,  I have done the same for copper removal but I'm way more careful in rifle barrels (they do make copper coated steel scrub pads never use this type ).   NEVER NEVER will I use any stainless brush in any barrel,   Revolver stainless steel  cylinder brushes I do use sparingly but only in the revolvers cylinder, never in an automatic or single shot.

+1 on everything
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2020, 05:36:35 AM »
Talk about timming Mike.
I have my 1st varmint leauge shoot of the year this Sunday.
So once A year I clean my target rifle real through.  I used a bronze brush 3 times. Even 1 oversized. Over a 2 day period ran 100 or so soaked patches with BTE. 2 applications of J B bore paste. And still can't get it completely clean.
I never can. Every year I just say good enough for who its for.  We shoot 25 rounds per match. And I shoot 6 of the 7 matches. So about 150 rounds A year.
I almost started my own post on what does it take to get A rifle clean.
We are allowed 5 sighters. I will use 3 of those just to foul and heat up the barrel before my 1st shot for score. That seems to work for this rifle.

Mark if your using a Bronze brush with BTE it will give you a false positive reading, switch to nylon and you'll notice a difference.
Mike I usually do a complete cleaning after a 50-60 rounds or so with my rifles, except for my 223 and 5.56-those I clean at 200 rounds. I can't say I have ever noticed a drop off in accuracy, I just can't stand the thought of a really dirty barrel. I always put a patch with Marvel Mystery oil thru the barrel before I put them away before winter, just because that's what my Dad always did.

Marvel Mystery oil, that's a new one. I would bet it works
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2020, 05:38:51 AM »
I gernerally clean mine after appx 30 rounds are gone. I'm not that anal on copper, as when you fire the first round after cleaning the copper is back, but the carbon scares me. In particular the so called carbon ring. Once this forms it is very hard to get cleaned. So after 30 rounds I try my best to get all carbon removed. I use Boretech C4 for the carbon as well as CLR and Boretech Cu+2 for the copper. I find them both work great.

I am cleaning the .204 now, a lot of fouling. I won't be shooting that much again before cleaning.
Mike

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Re: Barrel cleaning
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2020, 05:43:02 AM »
I try to clean after every use.I soak a nylon brush in hoppes, push it once through and let it sit a few minutes. Then I wrap a cleaning patch around the brush and run a few through till itís fairly clean. Then I put hoppes oil on a brush wrapped with a cleaning patch . One stroke through. Then run about three patches through till Iím sure itís dry. I stick a cleaning rag in the magazine and force it close to the chamber to try and keep run off out. My brother almost bought a used 300 weatherby from a co-worker. He took it to a gunsmith and had it bore scoped. Barrel was shot. Chunks missing out of the rifling. Gunsmith said probably from lack of cleaning. Definitely takes a few fowlers in my experience to bring accuracy back. Some more than others

Chunks missing from rifling, lack of cleaning
Did the smith give any other information. Rust do to the lack of cleaning or anything like that?
Mike